Considering
Consider Con*sid"er (k[o^]n*s[i^]d"[~e]r), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Considered} (k[o^]n*s[i^]d"[~e]rd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Considering}.] [F. consid['e]rer, L. considerare, -sideratum, to consider, view attentively, prob. fr. con- + sidus, sideris, star, constellation; orig., therefore, to look at the stars. See {Sidereal}, and cf. {Desire}.] 1. To fix the mind on, with a view to a careful examination; to think on with care; to ponder; to study; to meditate on. [1913 Webster]

I will consider thy testimonies. --Ps. cxix. 95. [1913 Webster]

Thenceforth to speculations high or deep I turned my thoughts, and with capacious mind Considered all things visible. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. To look at attentively; to observe; to examine. [1913 Webster]

She considereth a field, and buyeth it. --Prov. xxxi. 16. [1913 Webster]

3. To have regard to; to take into view or account; to pay due attention to; to respect. [1913 Webster]

Consider, sir, the chance of war: the day Was yours by accident. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

England could grow into a posture of being more united at home, and more considered abroad. --Sir W. Temple. [1913 Webster]

4. To estimate; to think; to regard; to view. [1913 Webster]

Considered as plays, his works are absurd. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

Note: The proper sense of consider is often blended with an idea of the result of considering; as, ``Blessed is he that considereth the poor.'' --Ps. xli. 1.; i.e., considers with sympathy and pity. ``Which [services] if I have not enough considered.'' --Shak.; i.e., requited as the sufficient considering of them would suggest. ``Consider him liberally.'' --J. Hooker.

Syn: To ponder; weigh; revolve; study; reflect or meditate on; contemplate; examine. See {Ponder}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • considering — has been used for centuries as a preposition and conjunction meaning ‘taking into account (that)’. Like given and granted, it is grammatically independent of the subject: • It s odd that one boasts considering that no one is ever taken in by it… …   Modern English usage

  • considering — [adj] taking everything in mind all in all, all things considered, as, as long as, because, everything being equal, for, forasmuch as, inasmuch as, in consideration of, in light of, insomuch as, in view of, now, pending, seeing, since, taking… …   New thesaurus

  • considering — ► PREPOSITION & CONJUNCTION ▪ taking into consideration. ► ADVERB informal ▪ taking everything into account …   English terms dictionary

  • considering — [kən sid′ər iŋ] prep. in view of; taking into account adv. Informal taking all circumstances into account; all things considered …   English World dictionary

  • considering — con|sid|er|ing [ kən sıd(ə)rıŋ ] function word ** Considering can be used in the following ways: as a preposition (followed by a noun): Considering her lack of experience, it is surprising she has achieved so much. before words such as that, what …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • considering */*/ — UK [kənˈsɪdərɪŋ] / US [kənˈsɪd(ə)rɪŋ] preposition, conjunction Summary: Considering can be used in the following ways: as a preposition (followed by a noun): Considering her lack of experience, it is surprising she has achieved so much. before… …   English dictionary

  • considering — con|sid|er|ing1 [kənˈsıdərıŋ] prep, conj used to say that you are thinking about a particular fact when you are giving your opinion ▪ Considering the strength of the opposition, we did very well to score two goals. considering (that) ▪ I think we …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • considering — [[t]kənsɪ̱dərɪŋ[/t]] ♦♦♦ 1) PREP You use considering to indicate that you are thinking about a particular fact when making a judgement or giving an opinion. He must be hoping, but considering the situation in June he may hoping for too much too… …   English dictionary

  • considering — 1 preposition, conjunction used when describing a situation, before stating a fact that you know has had an effect on that situation: Considering the strength of the opposition, we did very well to score two goals. | considering that/who/how etc …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • considering — /keuhn sid euhr ing/, prep. 1. taking into account; in view of: The campaign was a great success, considering the strong opposition. adv. 2. Informal. with all things considered (used only after the statement it modifies): He paints very well,… …   Universalium

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