Consequential damage
Consequential Con`se*quen"tial, a. 1. Following as a consequence, result, or logical inference; consequent. [1913 Webster]

All that is revealed in Scripture has a consequential necessity of being believed . . . because it is of divine authority. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

These kind of arguments . . . are highly consequential and concludent to my purpose. --Sir M. Hale. [1913 Webster]

2. Assuming or exhibiting an air of consequence; pretending to importance; pompous; self-important; as, a consequential man. See {Consequence}, n., 4. [1913 Webster]

His stately and consequential pace. --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster]

{Consequential damage} (Law) (a) Damage so remote as not to be actionable (b) Damage which although remote is actionable. (c) Actionable damage, but not following as an immediate result of an act. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Consequential damage — Damage Dam age (d[a^]m [asl]j; 48), n. [OF. damage, domage, F. dommage, fr. assumed LL. damnaticum, from L. damnum damage. See {Damn}.] 1. Injury or harm to person, property, or reputation; an inflicted loss of value; detriment; hurt; mischief.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • consequential damage — is loss or damage which is not a direct result of a breach of contract or negligence but occurs as a consequence (e.g. lost future sales). A seller will normally exclude responsibility for such damages in the supply contract or terms and… …   Law dictionary

  • Consequential — Con se*quen tial, a. 1. Following as a consequence, result, or logical inference; consequent. [1913 Webster] All that is revealed in Scripture has a consequential necessity of being believed . . . because it is of divine authority. Locke. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • consequential loss — see loss Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. consequential loss …   Law dictionary

  • Damage — Dam age (d[a^]m [asl]j; 48), n. [OF. damage, domage, F. dommage, fr. assumed LL. damnaticum, from L. damnum damage. See {Damn}.] 1. Injury or harm to person, property, or reputation; an inflicted loss of value; detriment; hurt; mischief. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • consequential — adj. 1 following as a result or consequence. 2 resulting indirectly (consequential damage). 3 (of a person) self important. Derivatives: consequentiality n. consequentially adv. Etymology: L consequentia …   Useful english dictionary

  • damage — dam·age 1 n [Old French, from dam injury, harm, from Latin damnum financial loss, fine] 1: loss or harm resulting from injury to person, property, or reputation 2 pl: the money awarded to a party in a civil suit as reparation for the loss or… …   Law dictionary

  • consequential damages — see damage 2 Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. consequential damages …   Law dictionary

  • damage — ▪ I. damage dam‧age 1 [ˈdæmɪdʒ] noun 1. [uncountable] a bad effect on something that makes it weaker or less successful: damage to • The result of this policy will be severe damage to the British economy. 2. [uncountable] physical harm caused to… …   Financial and business terms

  • Consequential Loss — The amount of loss incurred as a result of being unable to use business property or equipment. If the property/equipment is damaged through a natural disaster or accident, only certain types of insurance can cover the owner for lost business… …   Investment dictionary

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