Consent Con*sent", v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Consented}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Consenting}.] [F. consentir, fr. L. consentire, -sensum, to feel together, agree; con- + sentire to feel. See {Sense}.] 1. To agree in opinion or sentiment; to be of the same mind; to accord; to concur. [1913 Webster]

And Saul was consenting unto his death. --Acts. viii. 1. [1913 Webster]

Flourishing many years before Wyclif, and much consenting with him in jugdment. --Fuller. [1913 Webster]

2. To indicate or express a willingness; to yield to guidance, persuasion, or necessity; to give assent or approval; to comply. [1913 Webster]

My poverty, but not my will, consents. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

And whispering ``I will ne'er consent,'' -- consented. --Byron.

Syn: To accede; yield; assent; comply; agree; allow; concede; permit; admit; concur; acquiesce. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • consent — con·sent n 1 a: compliance in or approval of what is done or proposed by another; specif: the voluntary agreement or acquiescence by a person of age or with requisite mental capacity who is not under duress or coercion and usu. who has knowledge… …   Law dictionary

  • consent — con‧sent [kənˈsent] noun [uncountable] 1. permission to do something, especially by someone who has authority or responsibility: • He took the car without the owner s consent. • The city authorities have given their consent to leases on two… …   Financial and business terms

  • Consent — Con*sent , n. [Cf. OF. consent.] 1. Agreement in opinion or sentiment; the being of one mind; accord. [1913 Webster] All with one consent began to make excuse. Luke xiv. 18. [1913 Webster] They fell together all, as by consent. Shak. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • consent — [kən sent′] vi. [ME consenten < OFr consentir < L consentire < com , with + sentire, to feel: see SENSE] 1. a) to agree (to do something) b) to willingly engage in a sexual act: often in the phrase consenting adult c) to give permission …   English World dictionary

  • Consent — Con*sent , v. t. To grant; to allow; to assent to; to admit. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Interpreters . . . will not consent it to be a true story. Milton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • consent — (v.) early 13c., from O.Fr. consentir (12c.) agree, comply, from L. consentire feel together, from com with (see COM (Cf. com )) + sentire to feel. Feeling together, hence, agreeing, giving permission, apparently a sense evolution that took place …   Etymology dictionary

  • consent — [n] agreement; concession accord, acquiescence, allowance, approval, assent, authorization, blank check*, blessing, carte blanche*, compliance, concurrence, goahead*, green light*, leave, okay*, permission, permit, right on*, sanction, say so*,… …   New thesaurus

  • consent — vb *assent, accede, acquiesce, agree, subscribe Analogous words: *yield, submit, defer, relent: permit, allow, *let: *approve, sanction: concur (see AGREE) Antonyms: dissent Contrasted words: refuse, * …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • consent — ► NOUN ▪ permission or agreement. ► VERB 1) give permission. 2) agree to do. ORIGIN from Latin consentire agree …   English terms dictionary

  • consent — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun ADJECTIVE ▪ full ▪ common, general, mutual, unanimous ▪ By unanimous consent, the Senate inserted a moratorium. ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

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