connoting
connote con*note" (k[o^]n*n[=o]t"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {connoted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {connoting}.] [See {connotate}, and {cote}.] 1. To mark along with; to suggest or indicate as additional; to designate by implication; to include in the meaning; to imply. [1913 Webster]

Good, in the general notion of it, connotes also a certain suitableness of it to some other thing. --South. [1913 Webster]

2. (Logic) To imply as an attribute. [1913 Webster]

The word ``white'' denotes all white things, as snow, paper, the foam of the sea, etc., and ipmlies, or as it was termed by the schoolmen, connotes, the attribute ``whiteness.'' --J. S. Mill. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • connoting — con·note || kÉ’ nəʊt v. imply, suggest, hint, insinuate, infer …   English contemporary dictionary

  • deliberate and premeditated — Connoting careful consideration and examination of the reasons for and against a choice or measure; some plan thought out before the commission of the act and a decision to act according to a plan. People v Bender, 27 Cal 2d 164, 163 P2d 8;… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • allow — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. grant, permit; concede; tolerate, suffer, let. See disclosure, consent, permission. Ant., prohibit, forbid. II (Roget s IV) v. 1. [To permit an action] Syn. permit, let, sanction, grant, consent to,… …   English dictionary for students

  • divine — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) adj. godlike, superhuman; celestial, heavenly; holy, spiritual; religious. See deity, religion, goodness. II (Roget s IV) modif. 1. [Having qualities of a god] Syn. godlike, godly, supernal, superhuman,… …   English dictionary for students

  • let — let1 [let] vt. let, letting [ME leten < OE lætan, to leave behind, akin to Ger lassen < IE * lēd < base * lēi , to neglect, leave behind > LATE, L letum, death] 1. to leave; forsake; abandon: now only in phrases let alone or let be or …   English World dictionary

  • Connotation — Con no*ta tion (k[o^]n n[ o]*t[=a] sh[u^]n), n. [Cf. F. connotation.] The act of connoting; a making known or designating something additional; implication of something more than is asserted. [1913 Webster] 2. a meaning implied but not explicitly …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • connote — con*note (k[o^]n*n[=o]t ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {connoted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {connoting}.] [See {connotate}, and {cote}.] 1. To mark along with; to suggest or indicate as additional; to designate by implication; to include in the meaning; to imply …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • connoted — connote con*note (k[o^]n*n[=o]t ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {connoted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {connoting}.] [See {connotate}, and {cote}.] 1. To mark along with; to suggest or indicate as additional; to designate by implication; to include in the meaning;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • connotative — adjective Date: 1614 1. connoting or tending to connote 2. relating to connotation • connotatively adverb …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • connote — transitive verb (connoted; connoting) Etymology: Medieval Latin connotare, from Latin com + notare to note Date: 1665 1. to be associated with or inseparable from as a consequence or concomitant < the remorse so often connoted by guilt > …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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