connoted
connote con*note" (k[o^]n*n[=o]t"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {connoted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {connoting}.] [See {connotate}, and {cote}.] 1. To mark along with; to suggest or indicate as additional; to designate by implication; to include in the meaning; to imply. [1913 Webster]

Good, in the general notion of it, connotes also a certain suitableness of it to some other thing. --South. [1913 Webster]

2. (Logic) To imply as an attribute. [1913 Webster]

The word ``white'' denotes all white things, as snow, paper, the foam of the sea, etc., and ipmlies, or as it was termed by the schoolmen, connotes, the attribute ``whiteness.'' --J. S. Mill. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • connoted — index assumed (inferred), constructive (inferential), implied, tacit Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • connoted — con·note || kÉ’ nəʊt v. imply, suggest, hint, insinuate, infer …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Art history — is the academic study of objects of art in their historical development and stylistic contexts, i.e. genre, design, format, and look. [ [http://wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=art%20history Art History] . WordNet Search 3.0, princeton.edu]… …   Wikipedia

  • connote — transitive verb (connoted; connoting) Etymology: Medieval Latin connotare, from Latin com + notare to note Date: 1665 1. to be associated with or inseparable from as a consequence or concomitant < the remorse so often connoted by guilt > …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Civil union — Legal recognition of same sex relationships Marriage Argentina Belgium Canada Iceland Netherlands Norway Portugal South Africa Spain Sweden …   Wikipedia

  • connote — UK [kəˈnəʊt] / US [kəˈnoʊt] verb [transitive] Word forms connote : present tense I/you/we/they connote he/she/it connotes present participle connoting past tense connoted past participle connoted formal 1) if a word connotes something, it… …   English dictionary

  • connote — con*note (k[o^]n*n[=o]t ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {connoted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {connoting}.] [See {connotate}, and {cote}.] 1. To mark along with; to suggest or indicate as additional; to designate by implication; to include in the meaning; to imply …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • connoting — connote con*note (k[o^]n*n[=o]t ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {connoted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {connoting}.] [See {connotate}, and {cote}.] 1. To mark along with; to suggest or indicate as additional; to designate by implication; to include in the meaning;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Kindlier — Kindly Kind ly (k[imac]nd l[y^]), a. [Compar. {Kindlier} (k[imac]nd l[i^]*[ e]r); superl. {Kindliest}.] [AS. cyndelic. See {Kind}, n. ] [1913 Webster] 1. According to the kind or nature; natural. [R.] [1913 Webster] The kindly fruits of the earth …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Kindliest — Kindly Kind ly (k[imac]nd l[y^]), a. [Compar. {Kindlier} (k[imac]nd l[i^]*[ e]r); superl. {Kindliest}.] [AS. cyndelic. See {Kind}, n. ] [1913 Webster] 1. According to the kind or nature; natural. [R.] [1913 Webster] The kindly fruits of the earth …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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