Connotative term
Connotative Con*no"ta*tive (k[o^]n*n[=o]"t[.a]*t[i^]v or k[o^]n"n[-o]*t[asl]*t[i^]v), a. 1. Implying something additional; illative. [1913 Webster]

2. (Log.) Implying an attribute. See {Connote}. [1913 Webster]

{Connotative term}, one which denotes a subject and implies an attribute. --J. S. Mill. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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