Congratulate Con*grat"u*late, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Congratulated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Congratulating}.] [L. congratulatus, p. p. of congratulari to wish joy abundantly; con- + gratulari to wish joy, from gratus pleasing. See {Grateful}.] To address with expressions of sympathetic pleasure on account of some happy event affecting the person addressed; to wish joy to. [1913 Webster]

It is the king's most sweet pleasure and affection to congratulate the princess at her pavilion. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{To congratulate one's self}, to rejoice; to feel satisfaction; to consider one's self happy or fortunate.

Syn: {To Congratulate}, {Felicitate}.

Usage: To felicitate is simply to wish a person joy. To congratulate has the additional signification of uniting in the joy of him whom we congratulate. Hence they are by no means synonymous. One who has lost the object of his affections by her marriage to a rival, might perhaps felicitate that rival on his success, but could never be expected to congratulate him on such an event. [1913 Webster]

Felicitations are little better than compliments; congratulations are the expression of a genuine sympathy and joy. --Trench. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Congratulate — Con*grat u*late, v. i. To express of feel sympathetic joy; as, to congratulate with one s country. [R.] Swift. [1913 Webster] The subjects of England may congratulate to themselves. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • congratulate — (v.) 1540s, from L. congratulatus, pp. of congratulari to congratulate (see CONGRATULATION (Cf. congratulation)). Related: Congratulated; congratulating …   Etymology dictionary

  • congratulate — ► VERB 1) express good wishes or praise at the happiness, success, or good fortune of. 2) (congratulate oneself) think oneself fortunate or clever. DERIVATIVES congratulatory adjective. ORIGIN Latin congratulari, from gratus pleasing …   English terms dictionary

  • congratulate — [kən grach′ə lāt΄, kəngraj′oo lāt΄] vt. congratulated, congratulating [< L congratulatus, pp. of congratulari < com, together + gratulari, to wish joy < gratus, agreeable: see GRACE] 1. to express to (a person) one s pleasure at good… …   English World dictionary

  • congratulate — index honor Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • congratulate — *felicitate Contrasted words: console, solace, *comfort: commiserate, condole with, pity (see corresponding nouns at SYMPATHY) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • congratulate — [v] compliment on achievement, luck applaud, bless, boost, felicitate, give a big cigar*, give bouquet*, give regards, gold star*, hand it to*, hear it for*, laud, pat on back, praise, rejoice with, salute, stroke*, toast, wish happy returns*,… …   New thesaurus

  • congratulate — 01. I would just like to [congratulate] the newly married couple on this, the most important day in their lives. 02. The office staff bought a lovely gift to [congratulate] Bjork on the birth of her first child. 03. The couple received letters of …   Grammatical examples in English

  • congratulate — v. 1) to congratulate heartily, sincerely, warmly 2) (D; refl. tr.) to congratulate on, upon (to congratulate smb. on her/his promotion) * * * [kən grætjʊleɪt] sincerely warmly upon (to congratulate smb. on her/his promotion) (D; refl. tr.) to… …   Combinatory dictionary

  • congratulate — [[t]kəngræ̱tʃʊleɪt[/t]] congratulates, congratulating, congratulated 1) VERB If you congratulate someone, you say something to show you are pleased that something nice has happened to them. [V n on/for n/ ing] She congratulated him on the birth… …   English dictionary

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