Congiary
Congiary Con"gi*a*ry, n.; pl. {Congiaries}. [L. congiarium, fr. congius a liquid measure.] A present, as of corn, wine, or oil, made by a Roman emperor to the soldiers or the people; -- so called because measured to each in a congius. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

Note: In later years, when gifts of money were distributed, the name congius was retained. [1913 Webster] ||


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • congiary — con·gi·ary …   English syllables

  • congiary — ˈkänjēˌerē noun ( es) Etymology: Latin congiarium, from congius + arium ary : a present or largess (as of corn, wine, or oil) made in ancient Rome to the soldiers or the people …   Useful english dictionary

  • Congiaries — Congiary Con gi*a*ry, n.; pl. {Congiaries}. [L. congiarium, fr. congius a liquid measure.] A present, as of corn, wine, or oil, made by a Roman emperor to the soldiers or the people; so called because measured to each in a congius. Addison. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Congiarium — Of Ancient Roman containers, a congiarium, or congiary, (Latin, from congius) was a vessel containing one congius, a measure of volume equal to six sextarii.[1] In the early times of the Roman Republic, the congius was the usual measure of oil or …   Wikipedia

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