Confront Con*front", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Confronted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Confronting}.] [F. confronter; L. con- + frons the forehead or front. See {Front}.] 1. To stand facing or in front of; to face; esp. to face hostilely; to oppose with firmness. [1913 Webster]

We four, indeed, confronted were with four In Russian habit. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

He spoke and then confronts the bull. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

Hester caught hold of Pearl, and drew her forcibly into her arms, confronting the old Puritan magistrate with almost a fierce expression. --Hawthorne. [1913 Webster]

It was impossible at once to confront the might of France and to trample on the liberties of England. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

2. To put face to face; to cause to face or to meet; as, to confront one with the proofs of his wrong doing. [1913 Webster]

3. To set in opposition for examination; to put in contrast; to compare. [1913 Webster]

When I confront a medal with a verse, I only show you the same design executed by different hands. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • confront — con·front /kən frənt/ vt: to face or bring face to face for the purpose of challenging esp. through cross examination the accused shall enjoy the be confront ed with the witnesses against him U.S. Constitution amend. VI… …   Law dictionary

  • confront — [kən frunt′] vt. [Fr confronter < ML confrontare < L com , together + frons, forehead: see FRONT1] 1. to face; stand or meet face to face 2. to face or oppose boldly, defiantly, or antagonistically 3. to bring face to face (with) [to… …   English World dictionary

  • confront — 1560s, to stand in front of, from M.Fr. confronter (15c.), from M.L. confrontare assign limits, adjoin, from L. com together (see COM (Cf. com )) + frontem (nom. frons) forehead (see FRONT (Cf. front) (n.)). Sense of to fa …   Etymology dictionary

  • confront — vb *meet, face, encounter Analogous words: defy, beard, challenge, brave, dare (see FACE): oppose, withstand, *resist Antonyms: recoil from …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • confront — [v] challenge accost, affront, beard, brave, call one’s bluff*, come up against*, dare, defy, encounter, face down*, face up to*, face with*, flout, front, go one on one*, go up against*, make my day*, meet, meet eyeballto eyeball*, oppose, repel …   New thesaurus

  • confront — ► VERB 1) meet face to face in hostility or defiance. 2) (of a problem) present itself to. 3) face up to and deal with (a problem). 4) compel to face or consider something. DERIVATIVES confrontation noun confrontational adjective …   English terms dictionary

  • confront — [[t]kənfrʌ̱nt[/t]] ♦♦♦ confronts, confronting, confronted 1) VERB If you are confronted with a problem, task, or difficulty, you have to deal with it. [be V ed with/by n] She was confronted with severe money problems... [V n] Ministers… …   English dictionary

  • confront — verb ADVERB ▪ directly, head on, squarely ▪ The new state confronted head on the question of national identity. ▪ He is willing to confront problems directly. ▪ aggressively …   Collocations dictionary

  • confront */*/ — UK [kənˈfrʌnt] / US verb [transitive] Word forms confront : present tense I/you/we/they confront he/she/it confronts present participle confronting past tense confronted past participle confronted 1) [often passive] to go close to someone in a… …   English dictionary

  • confront — transitive verb Etymology: Middle French confronter to border on, confront, from Medieval Latin confrontare to bound, from Latin com + front , frons forehead, front Date: circa 1568 1. to face especially in challenge ; oppose < confront …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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