Condign
Condign Con*dign", a. [F. condigne, L. condignus very worthy; con- + dignus worthy. See {Deign}, and cf. {Digne}.] 1. Worthy; suitable; deserving; fit. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Condign and worthy praise. --Udall. [1913 Webster]

Herself of all that rule she deemend most condign. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

2. Deserved; adequate; suitable to the fault or crime. ``Condign censure.'' --Milman. [1913 Webster]

Unless it were a bloody murderer . . . I never gave them condign punishment. --Shak. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Condign — may refer to: Condign merit, an aspect of Roman Catholic theology signifying a goodness that has been bestowed because of the actions of that person Project Condign, a top secret UFO study undertaken by the British government between 1997 and… …   Wikipedia

  • condign — I adjective appropriate, befitting, debitus, deserved, due, earned, fit, fitting, just, justified, merited, meritus, right, suitable, warranted, well deserved, well earned, worthy II index appropriate, due ( …   Law dictionary

  • condign — late 15c., well deserved, from O.Fr. condigne deserved, appropriate, equal in wealth, from L. condignus wholly worthy, from com together, altogether (see COM (Cf. com )) + dignus worthy (see DIGNITY (Cf. dignity)). Of punishment, deservedly sever …   Etymology dictionary

  • condign — *due, rightful Analogous words: just, equitable, *fair: merited, deserved (see corresponding nouns at DUE) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • condign — [kən dīn′, kän′dīn΄] adj. [ME & OFr condigne < L condignus, very worthy < com , intens. + dignus, worthy: see DIGNITY] deserved; suitable: said esp. of punishment for wrongdoing condignly adv …   English World dictionary

  • condign — [15] From its virtually exclusive modern use in the phrase condign punishment, condign has come to be regarded frequently as meaning ‘severe’, but etymologically it signifies ‘fully deserved’. It comes via Old French condigne from Latin condignus …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • condign — [15] From its virtually exclusive modern use in the phrase condign punishment, condign has come to be regarded frequently as meaning ‘severe’, but etymologically it signifies ‘fully deserved’. It comes via Old French condigne from Latin condignus …   Word origins

  • condign — adjective Etymology: Middle English condigne, from Anglo French, from Latin condignus, from com + dignus worthy more at decent Date: 15th century deserved, appropriate < condign punishment > • condignly adverb …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • condign — condignly, adv. /keuhn duyn /, adj. well deserved; fitting; adequate: condign punishment. [1375 1425; late ME condigne < AF, MF < L condignus, equiv. to con CON + dignus worthy; see DIGNITY] Syn. appropriate, suitable. * * * …   Universalium

  • condign — con•dign [[t]kənˈdaɪn[/t]] adj. well deserved; fitting; adequate: condign punishment[/ex] • Etymology: 1375–1425; late ME condigne < AF, MF < L condignus=con con +dignus worthy; see dignity con•dign′ly, adv …   From formal English to slang

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