Condescended
Condescend Con`de*scend", v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Condescended}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Condescending}.] [F. condescendre, LL. condescendere, fr. L. con- + descendere. See {Descend}.] 1. To stoop or descend; to let one's self down; to submit; to waive the privilege of rank or dignity; to accommodate one's self to an inferior. ``Condescend to men of low estate.'' --Rom. xii. 16. [1913 Webster]

Can they think me so broken, so debased With corporal servitude, that my mind ever Will condescend to such absurd commands? --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Spain's mighty monarch, In gracious clemency, does condescend, On these conditions, to become your friend. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

Note: Often used ironically, implying an assumption of superiority. [1913 Webster]

Those who thought they were honoring me by condescending to address a few words to me. --F. W. Robinson. [1913 Webster]

2. To consent. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

All parties willingly condescended heruento. --R. Carew.

Syn: To yield; stoop; descend; deign; vouchsafe. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • condescended — † condescended, ppl. a. Agreed: see prec. 9 …   Useful english dictionary

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  • condescend — UK [ˌkɒndɪˈsend] / US [ˌkɑndəˈsend] verb [intransitive] Word forms condescend : present tense I/you/we/they condescend he/she/it condescends present participle condescending past tense condescended past participle condescended to behave in a way… …   English dictionary

  • Condescend — Con de*scend , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Condescended}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Condescending}.] [F. condescendre, LL. condescendere, fr. L. con + descendere. See {Descend}.] 1. To stoop or descend; to let one s self down; to submit; to waive the privilege… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • con|de|scend — «KON dih SEHND», intransitive verb. 1. to come down willingly or graciously to the level of one s inferiors in rank: »The king condescended to eat with the beggars. SYNONYM(S): deign, stoop. 2. to grant a favor with a haughty or patronizing… …   Useful english dictionary

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