Concrete quantity
Concrete Con"crete (? or ?), a. [L. concretus, p. p. of concrescere to grow together; con- + crescere to grow; cf. F. concret. See {Crescent}.] 1. United in growth; hence, formed by coalition of separate particles into one mass; united in a solid form. [1913 Webster]

The first concrete state, or consistent surface, of the chaos must be of the same figure as the last liquid state. --Bp. Burnet. [1913 Webster]

2. (Logic) (a) Standing for an object as it exists in nature, invested with all its qualities, as distinguished from standing for an attribute of an object; -- opposed to {abstract}. Hence: (b) Applied to a specific object; special; particular; -- opposed to {general}. See {Abstract}, 3. [1913 Webster]

Concrete is opposed to abstract. The names of individuals are concrete, those of classes abstract. --J. S. Mill. [1913 Webster]

Concrete terms, while they express the quality, do also express, or imply, or refer to, some subject to which it belongs. --I. Watts. [1913 Webster]

{Concrete number}, a number associated with, or applied to, a particular object, as three men, five days, etc., as distinguished from an abstract number, or one used without reference to a particular object.

{Concrete quantity}, a physical object or a collection of such objects. --Davies & Peck.

{Concrete science}, a physical science, one having as its subject of knowledge concrete things instead of abstract laws.

{Concrete sound or movement of the voice}, one which slides continuously up or down, as distinguished from a {discrete} movement, in which the voice leaps at once from one line of pitch to another. --Rush. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Concrete — Con crete (? or ?), a. [L. concretus, p. p. of concrescere to grow together; con + crescere to grow; cf. F. concret. See {Crescent}.] 1. United in growth; hence, formed by coalition of separate particles into one mass; united in a solid form.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Concrete number — Concrete Con crete (? or ?), a. [L. concretus, p. p. of concrescere to grow together; con + crescere to grow; cf. F. concret. See {Crescent}.] 1. United in growth; hence, formed by coalition of separate particles into one mass; united in a solid… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Concrete science — Concrete Con crete (? or ?), a. [L. concretus, p. p. of concrescere to grow together; con + crescere to grow; cf. F. concret. See {Crescent}.] 1. United in growth; hence, formed by coalition of separate particles into one mass; united in a solid… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Concrete sound or movement of the voice — Concrete Con crete (? or ?), a. [L. concretus, p. p. of concrescere to grow together; con + crescere to grow; cf. F. concret. See {Crescent}.] 1. United in growth; hence, formed by coalition of separate particles into one mass; united in a solid… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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