Comported
Comport Com*port", v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Comported}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Comporting}.] [F. comporter, LL. comportare, fr.L. comportare to bring together; com- + portare to carry. See {Port demeanor}.] 1. To bear or endure; to put up (with); as, to comport with an injury. [Obs.] --Barrow. [1913 Webster]

2. To agree; to accord; to suit; -- sometimes followed by with. [1913 Webster]

How ill this dullness doth comport with greatness. --Beau. & Fl. [1913 Webster]

How their behavior herein comported with the institution. --Locke. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • comported — com·port || kÉ™m pɔːt v. behave, conduct oneself in a certain manner …   English contemporary dictionary

  • comport yourself — very formal phrase to behave in a particular way He comported himself most foolishly. Thesaurus: to behave in a particular waysynonym Main entry: comport * * * comport yourself formal : to behave in a certain way …   Useful english dictionary

  • Comport — Com*port , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Comported}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Comporting}.] [F. comporter, LL. comportare, fr.L. comportare to bring together; com + portare to carry. See {Port demeanor}.] 1. To bear or endure; to put up (with); as, to comport… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Comporting — Comport Com*port , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Comported}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Comporting}.] [F. comporter, LL. comportare, fr.L. comportare to bring together; com + portare to carry. See {Port demeanor}.] 1. To bear or endure; to put up (with); as, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • comport — UK [kəmˈpɔː(r)t] / US [kəmˈpɔrt] verb Word forms comport : present tense I/you/we/they comport he/she/it comports present participle comporting past tense comported past participle comported comport yourself …   English dictionary

  • Comport — Com*port , v. t. 1. To bear; to endure; to brook; to put with. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The malcontented sort That never can the present state comport. Daniel. [1913 Webster] 2. To carry; to conduct; with a reflexive pronoun. [1913 Webster] Observe… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • behave — verb (behaved; behaving) Etymology: Middle English behaven, from be + haven to have, hold Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to manage the actions of (oneself) in a particular way 2. to conduct (oneself) in a proper manner …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • comport — I. verb Etymology: Middle French comporter to bear, conduct, from Latin comportare to bring together, from com + portare to carry more at fare Date: 1589 intransitive verb to be fitting ; accord < actions that comport with policy > transitive… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Cold War (1947–1953) — Part of a series on the History of the Cold War Origins of the Cold War World War II …   Wikipedia

  • Charles Manson — The Manson Family redirects here. For the 2003 film, see The Manson Family (film). Charles Milles Manson …   Wikipedia

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