Competency
Competence Com"pe*tence, Competency Com"pe*ten*cy, n. [Cf. F. comp['e]tence, from L. competentia agreement.] 1. The state of being competent; fitness; ability; adequacy; power. [1913 Webster]

The loan demonstrates, in regard to instrumental resources, the competency of this kingdom to the assertion of the common cause. --Burke. [1913 Webster]

To make them act zealously is not in the competence of law. --Burke. [1913 Webster]

2. Property or means sufficient for the necessaries and conveniences of life; sufficiency without excess. [1913 Webster]

Reason's whole pleasure, all the joys of sense, Lie in three words -- health, peace, and competence. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

Superfluity comes sooner by white hairs, but competency lives longer. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. (Law) (a) Legal capacity or qualifications; fitness; as, the competency of a witness or of a evidence. (b) Right or authority; legal power or capacity to take cognizance of a cause; as, the competence of a judge or court. --Kent. [1913 Webster]

5. the quality of being adequately or well qualified physically and intellectually, especially possession of the skill and knowledge required (for a task). [WordNet 1.5 +PJC]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • competency — com·pe·ten·cy / käm pə tən sē/ n 1: the quality or state of being mentally competent compare capacity, incompetence, insanity 2: the quality or s …   Law dictionary

  • competency — 1590s, rivalry; c.1600, sufficiency to satisfy the wants of life, from L. competentia meeting together, agreement, symmetry, from competens, prp. of competere (see COMPETE (Cf. compete)). Meaning sufficiency of qualification is recorded from 1797 …   Etymology dictionary

  • competency — In the law of evidence, the presence of those characteristics, or the absence of those disabilities, which render a witness legally fit and qualified to give testimony in a court of justice; applied, in the same sense, to documents or other… …   Black's law dictionary

  • competency — In the law of evidence, the presence of those characteristics, or the absence of those disabilities, which render a witness legally fit and qualified to give testimony in a court of justice; applied, in the same sense, to documents or other… …   Black's law dictionary

  • competency — competence, competency 1. Fowler (1926) remarked that ‘neither has any sense in which the other cannot be used’, and noted that the first form is gaining ground. This assertion remains generally valid, and in the meantime competence has won out… …   Modern English usage

  • competency — [[t]kɒ̱mpɪtənsi[/t]] N UNCOUNT Competency means the same as competence. ...managerial competency …   English dictionary

  • competency — UK [ˈkɒmpɪtənsɪ] / US [ˈkɑmpɪtənsɪ] noun Word forms competency : singular competency plural competencies 1) competence 2) an ability to do something, especially measured against a standard …   English dictionary

  • competency — noun /ˈkɒmpətənsi/ a) The ability to perform some task; competence. the next day they returned unsuspected, leaving their confederates to follow, and in the interim, to convay them a competencie of all things they could [...]. b) Meeting… …   Wiktionary

  • competency — kompetentingumas statusas T sritis Švietimas ir mokslas apibrėžtis Asmens savybė, pasireiškianti kaip socialinio elgesio, žinių, fizinių ir intelektinių gebėjimų visuma, leidžianti plėtoti kvalifikuotą darbinę veiklą darbo rinkoje. atitikmenys:… …   Aiškinamasis kvalifikacijų sistemos terminų žodynas

  • competency — noun (plural cies) Date: 1596 competence …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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