Commutation of tithes
Commutation Com`mu*ta"tion, n. [L. commutatio: cf. F. commutation.] 1. A passing from one state to another; change; alteration; mutation. [R.] [1913 Webster]

So great is the commutation that the soul then hated only that which now only it loves. --South. [1913 Webster]

2. The act of giving one thing for another; barter; exchange. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

The use of money is . . . that of saving the commutation of more bulky commodities. --Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster]

3. (Law) The change of a penalty or punishment by the pardoning power of the State; as, the commutation of a sentence of death to banishment or imprisonment. [1913 Webster]

Suits are allowable in the spiritual courts for money agreed to be given as a commutation for penance. --Blackstone. [1913 Webster]

4. A substitution, as of a less thing for a greater, esp. a substitution of one form of payment for another, or one payment for many, or a specific sum of money for conditional payments or allowances; as, commutation of tithes; commutation of fares; commutation of copyright; commutation of rations. [1913 Webster]

5. regular travel from a place of residence to a place where one's daily work is performed; commuting. Most often, such travel is performed between a suburb and a nearby city. [1913 Webster]

{Angle of commutation} (Astron.), the difference of the geocentric longitudes of the sun and a planet.

{Commutation of tithes}, the substitution of a regular payment, chargeable to the land, for the annual tithes in kind.

{Commutation ticket}, a ticket, as for transportation, which is the evidence of a contract for service at a reduced rate. See 2d {Commute}, 2. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • commutation of tithes — The payment of tithes in money, instead of produce …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • commutation of tithes — Signifies the conversion of tithes into a fixed payment in money …   Black's law dictionary

  • commutation of tithes — Signifies the conversion of tithes into a fixed payment in money …   Black's law dictionary

  • Commutation — Com mu*ta tion, n. [L. commutatio: cf. F. commutation.] 1. A passing from one state to another; change; alteration; mutation. [R.] [1913 Webster] So great is the commutation that the soul then hated only that which now only it loves. South. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Commutation ticket — Commutation Com mu*ta tion, n. [L. commutatio: cf. F. commutation.] 1. A passing from one state to another; change; alteration; mutation. [R.] [1913 Webster] So great is the commutation that the soul then hated only that which now only it loves.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tithes — Tenths; a species of incorporeal hereditaments, being the tenth part of the increase, yearly arising and renewing from the profits of lands, the stock upon lands, and the personal industry of the inhabitants, due the church for the support of the …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • tithes — /tay3z/ In English law, the tenth part of the increase, yearly arising and renewing from the profits of lands, the stock upon lands, and the personal industry of the inhabitants. 2 Bl.Comm. 24. A species of incorporeal hereditament, being an… …   Black's law dictionary

  • Angle of commutation — Commutation Com mu*ta tion, n. [L. commutatio: cf. F. commutation.] 1. A passing from one state to another; change; alteration; mutation. [R.] [1913 Webster] So great is the commutation that the soul then hated only that which now only it loves.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Tithe Commutation Act 1836 — The Tithe Commutation Act of 1836 (6 7 Will. IV, c.71) was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom with the long title An Act for the Commutation of Tithes in England and Wales . It replaced the ancient system of payment of tithes in kind… …   Wikipedia

  • John FitzGibbon, 1st Earl of Clare — (c.1749 near Dublin –28 January 1802 in Dublin), was the son of John FitzGibbon and his wife Isabella Grove, daughter of John Grove, of Ballyhimmock, County Cork, Ireland. FitzGibbon, later known as Earl of Clare or Lord Clare, was Attorney… …   Wikipedia

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