Collying
Colly Col"ly, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Collied}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Collying}.] To render black or dark, as of with coal smut; to begrime. [Archaic.] [1913 Webster]

Thou hast not collied thy face enough. --B. Jonson. [1913 Webster]

Brief as the lighting in the collied night. --Shak. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Collying — Her. Falconer s term used by *heralds to indicate the head of a bird erect in preparation for flight …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Collied — Colly Col ly, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Collied}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Collying}.] To render black or dark, as of with coal smut; to begrime. [Archaic.] [1913 Webster] Thou hast not collied thy face enough. B. Jonson. [1913 Webster] Brief as the lighting… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Colly — Col ly, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Collied}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Collying}.] To render black or dark, as of with coal smut; to begrime. [Archaic.] [1913 Webster] Thou hast not collied thy face enough. B. Jonson. [1913 Webster] Brief as the lighting in the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • colly — transitive verb (collied; collying) Etymology: alteration of Middle English colwen, from Old English *colgian, from Old English col coal Date: 1590 dialect chiefly British to blacken with or as if with soot …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • colly — /kol ee/, v., collied, collying, n. Brit. Dial. v.t. 1. to blacken as with coal dust; begrime. n. 2. grime; soot. [1555 65; var. of collow (v.), ME colwen, deriv. of OE col COAL; see Y1] * * * …   Universalium

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”