Cockle hat
Cockle Coc"kle (k[o^]k"k'l), n. [OE. cockes cockles, AS. s[=ae]coccas sea cockles, prob, from Celtic; cf. W. cocs cockles, Gael. cochull husk. Perh. influenced by F. coquille shell, a dim. from the root of E. conch. Cf. {Coach}.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) A bivalve mollusk, with radiating ribs, of the genus {Cardium}, especially {Cardium edule}, used in Europe for food; -- sometimes applied to similar shells of other genera. [1913 Webster]

2. A cockleshell. [1913 Webster]

3. The mineral black tourmaline or schorl; -- so called by the Cornish miners. --Raymond. [1913 Webster]

4. The fire chamber of a furnace. [Eng.] --Knight. [1913 Webster]

5. A hop-drying kiln; an oast. --Knight. [1913 Webster]

6. The dome of a heating furnace. --Knight. [1913 Webster]

{Cockle hat}, a hat ornamented with a cockleshell, the badge of a pilgrim. --Shak.

{Cockle stairs}, winding or spiral stairs. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • cockle hat — noun Etymology: cockle (II) (shell) : a hat bearing a cockleshell as the badge of a pilgrim especially to the shrine of St. James of Compostela in Spain * * * cockle hat noun A hat bearing a scallop shell, the badge of a pilgrim • • • Main Entry …   Useful english dictionary

  • Cockle — Coc kle (k[o^]k k l), n. [OE. cockes cockles, AS. s[=ae]coccas sea cockles, prob, from Celtic; cf. W. cocs cockles, Gael. cochull husk. Perh. influenced by F. coquille shell, a dim. from the root of E. conch. Cf. {Coach}.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) A bivalve …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cockle stairs — Cockle Coc kle (k[o^]k k l), n. [OE. cockes cockles, AS. s[=ae]coccas sea cockles, prob, from Celtic; cf. W. cocs cockles, Gael. cochull husk. Perh. influenced by F. coquille shell, a dim. from the root of E. conch. Cf. {Coach}.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) A… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cockle — This name has two possible derivations, the first from the early Medieval English or Olde French cokille which means a shell or cockle . This surname may have been applied to pilgrims to the Shrine of St. James of Compostella who sewed shells on… …   Surnames reference

  • cockle — {{11}}cockle (1) type of mollusk, early 14c., from O.Fr. coquille (13c.) scallop, scallop shell; mother of pearl; a kind of hat, altered (by influence of coque shell ) from V.L. *conchilia, from L. conchylium mussel, shellfish, from Gk.… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Pilgrim's hat — This article is about hat used by pilgrims on the Way of St. James. For hat associated with Puritan costume, see capotain. Saint James the Great with his pilgrim s staff. The hat is typical, but he often wears his emblem, the scallop shell on the …   Wikipedia

  • Cardium edule — Cockle Coc kle (k[o^]k k l), n. [OE. cockes cockles, AS. s[=ae]coccas sea cockles, prob, from Celtic; cf. W. cocs cockles, Gael. cochull husk. Perh. influenced by F. coquille shell, a dim. from the root of E. conch. Cf. {Coach}.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) A… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cheston — Recorded as Cockle, Cockell, Cockhill, Cockill, and possibly others, this is usually an English surname. It has two possible origins. The most romantic is from the pre 9th century Olde French word cokille , meaning a shell or cockle. As such the… …   Surnames reference

  • Cockhill — Recorded as Cockle, Cockell, Cockhill, Cockill, and possibly others, this is usually an English surname. It has two possible origins. The most romantic is from the pre 9th century Olde French word cokille , meaning a shell or cockle. As such the… …   Surnames reference

  • Cockill — Recorded as Cockle, Cockell, Cockhill, Cockill, and possibly others, this is usually an English surname. It has two possible origins. The most romantic is from the pre 9th century Olde French word cokille , meaning a shell or cockle. As such the… …   Surnames reference

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