Cob Cob, n. [Cf. AS. cop, copp, head, top, D. kop, G. kopf, kuppe, LL. cuppa cup (cf. E. brainpan), and also W. cob tuft, spider, cop, copa, top, summit, cobio to thump. Cf. {Cop} top, {Cup}, n.] 1. The top or head of anything. [Obs.] --W. Gifford. [1913 Webster]

2. A leader or chief; a conspicuous person, esp. a rich covetous person. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

All cobbing country chuffs, which make their bellies and their bags their god, are called rich cobs. --Nash. [1913 Webster]

3. The axis on which the kernels of maize or indian corn grow. [U. S.] [1913 Webster]

4. (Zo["o]l.) A spider; perhaps from its shape; it being round like a head. [1913 Webster]

5. (Zo["o]l.) A young herring. --B. Jonson. [1913 Webster]

6. (Zo["o]l.) A fish; -- also called {miller's thumb}. [1913 Webster]

7. A short-legged and stout horse, esp. one used for the saddle. [Eng.] [1913 Webster]

8. (Zo["o]l.) A sea mew or gull; esp., the black-backed gull ({Larus marinus}). [Written also {cobb}.] [1913 Webster]

9. A lump or piece of anything, usually of a somewhat large size, as of coal, or stone. [1913 Webster]

10. A cobnut; as, Kentish cobs. See {Cobnut}. [Eng.] [1913 Webster]

11. Clay mixed with straw. [Prov. Eng.] [1913 Webster]

The poor cottager contenteth himself with cob for his walls, and thatch for his covering. --R. Carew. [1913 Webster]

12. A punishment consisting of blows inflictod on tho buttocas with a strap or a flat piece of wood. --Wright. [1913 Webster]

13. A Spanish coin formerly current in Ireland, worth abiut 4s. 6d. [Obs.] --Wright. [1913 Webster]

{Cob coal}, coal in rounded lumps from the size of an egg to that of a football; -- called also {cobbles}. --Grose.

{Cob loaf}, a crusty, uneven loaf, rounded at top. --Wright.

{Cob money}, a kind of rudely coined gold and silver money of Spanish South America in the eighteenth century. The coins were of the weight of the piece of eight, or one of its aliquot parts. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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