Cloistering
Cloister Clois"ter, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cloistered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Cloistering}.] To confine in, or as in, a cloister; to seclude from the world; to immure. [1913 Webster]

None among them are thought worthy to be styled religious persons but those that cloister themselves up in a monastery. --Sharp. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • cloistering — clois·ter || klɔɪstÉ™ n. convent; monastery; covered walkway v. shut away; shut up in a convent or monastery …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Cloister — Clois ter, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cloistered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Cloistering}.] To confine in, or as in, a cloister; to seclude from the world; to immure. [1913 Webster] None among them are thought worthy to be styled religious persons but those… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cloistered — Cloister Clois ter, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cloistered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Cloistering}.] To confine in, or as in, a cloister; to seclude from the world; to immure. [1913 Webster] None among them are thought worthy to be styled religious persons but… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cloister — I. noun Etymology: Middle English cloistre, from Anglo French, from Medieval Latin claustrum, from Latin, bar, bolt, from claudere to close more at close Date: 13th century 1. a. a monastic establishment b. an area within a monastery or convent… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Spanish missions in California — Part of the Spanish missions in the Americas series Arizona …   Wikipedia

  • California mission clash of cultures — The California Missions are a series of religious outposts established by Spanish Catholic Franciscans from 1769 to 1823 for the purpose of spreading the Christian doctrine among the local Native Americans. The Spanish occupation of California… …   Wikipedia

  • cloister — {{11}}cloister (n.) early 13c., from O.Fr. cloistre monastery, convent (12c., Mod.Fr. cloître) or O.E. clauster, both from M.L. claustrum portion of monastery closed off to laity, from L. claustrum place shut in, enclosure; bar, bolt, means of… …   Etymology dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”