After all
All All, n. The whole number, quantity, or amount; the entire thing; everything included or concerned; the aggregate; the whole; totality; everything or every person; as, our all is at stake. [1913 Webster]

Death, as the Psalmist saith, is certain to all. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

All that thou seest is mine. --Gen. xxxi. 43. [1913 Webster]

Note: All is used with of, like a partitive; as, all of a thing, all of us. [1913 Webster]

{After all}, after considering everything to the contrary; nevertheless.

{All in all}, a phrase which signifies all things to a person, or everything desired; (also adverbially) wholly; altogether. [1913 Webster]

Thou shalt be all in all, and I in thee, Forever. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Trust me not at all, or all in all. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

{All in the wind} (Naut.), a phrase denoting that the sails are parallel with the course of the wind, so as to shake.

{All told}, all counted; in all.

{And all}, and the rest; and everything connected. ``Bring our crown and all.'' --Shak.

{At all}. (a) In every respect; wholly; thoroughly. [Obs.] ``She is a shrew at al(l).'' --Chaucer. (b) A phrase much used by way of enforcement or emphasis, usually in negative or interrogative sentences, and signifying in any way or respect; in the least degree or to the least extent; in the least; under any circumstances; as, he has no ambition at all; has he any property at all? ``Nothing at all.'' --Shak. ``If thy father at all miss me.'' --1 Sam. xx. 6.

{Over all}, everywhere. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Note: All is much used in composition to enlarge the meaning, or add force to a word. In some instances, it is completely incorporated into words, and its final consonant is dropped, as in almighty, already, always: but, in most instances, it is an adverb prefixed to adjectives or participles, but usually with a hyphen, as, all-bountiful, all-glorious, allimportant, all-surrounding, etc. In others it is an adjective; as, allpower, all-giver. Anciently many words, as, alabout, alaground, etc., were compounded with all, which are now written separately. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • After All — may refer to:* After All (David Bowie song) * After All (Cher song) * After All (Delerium song) * After All (Electric Light Orchestra song) * After All (Patty Loveless song) * After All (Luciano album) * After All! is a one act comic opera with a …   Wikipedia

  • after all — {adv. phr.} 1. As a change in plans; anyway. Used with emphasis on after . * /Bob thought he couldn t go to the party because he had too much homework, but he went after all./ 2. For a good reason that you should remember. Used with emphasis on… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • after all — {adv. phr.} 1. As a change in plans; anyway. Used with emphasis on after . * /Bob thought he couldn t go to the party because he had too much homework, but he went after all./ 2. For a good reason that you should remember. Used with emphasis on… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • After all — After Aft er, prep. 1. Behind in place; as, men in line one after another. Shut doors after you. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. Below in rank; next to in order. Shak. [1913 Webster] Codrus after Ph?bus sings the best. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 3. Later in… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • after all — after you consider all the facts, to be fair    Will you help me with English? After all, I helped you with math …   English idioms

  • After All — Bandlogo Al …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • after all — 1) used for saying that something is true despite what was said or planned before Maybe she was right after all. I m sorry, but we ve decided not to come after all. 2) used when giving a reason to explain what you have just said She shouldn t be… …   English dictionary

  • after all — adverb Date: 1846 1. in spite of considerations or expectations to the contrary ; nevertheless < decided to take the train after all > < didn t rain after all > 2. in view of all circumstances < literature which is after all only a specia …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • After All! — from May to June 1897. It was also performed on tour on numerous occasions through at least 1909.The piece contains only 4 songs, all of which were separately published (by Metzler) and are in the British Library. The fashion in the late… …   Wikipedia

  • after\ all — adv. phr. 1. As a change in plans; anyway. Used with emphasis on after . Bob thought he couldn t go to the party because he had too much homework, but he went after all. 2. For a good reason that you should remember. Used with emphasis on all .… …   Словарь американских идиом

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