Civil remedy
Remedy Rem"e*dy (r?m"?-d?), n.; pl. {Remedies} (-d?z). [L. remedium; pref. re- re- + mederi to heal, to cure: cf. F. rem[`e]de remedy, rem['e]dier to remedy. See {Medical}.] [1913 Webster] 1. That which relieves or cures a disease; any medicine or application which puts an end to disease and restores health; -- with for; as, a remedy for the gout. [1913 Webster]

2. That which corrects or counteracts an evil of any kind; a corrective; a counteractive; reparation; cure; -- followed by for or against, formerly by to. [1913 Webster]

What may else be remedy or cure To evils which our own misdeeds have wrought, He will instruct us. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

3. (Law) The legal means to recover a right, or to obtain redress for a wrong. [1913 Webster]

{Civil remedy}. See under {Civil}.

{Remedy of the mint} (Coinage), a small allowed deviation from the legal standard of weight and fineness; -- called also {tolerance}. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Cure; restorative; counteraction; reparation; redress; relief; aid; help; assistance. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Civil remedy — Civil Civ il, a. [L. civilis, fr. civis citizen: cf. F. civil. See {City}.] 1. Pertaining to a city or state, or to a citizen in his relations to his fellow citizens or to the state; within the city or state. [1913 Webster] 2. Subject to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • civil remedy — A remedy sought in the prosecution of a suit or action by or at the instance of a private person for the assertion of a private right. People ex ref. Raster v Healy, 230 Ill 280, 82 NE 599 …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • civil remedy — solution that a court of law provides in a civil case …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Civil Rights Act of 1871 — Full title An Act to enforce the Provisions of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States and for other Purposes Colloquial name(s) Ku Klux Klan Act Enacted by the 24th United States Congress …   Wikipedia

  • Remedy — Rem e*dy (r?m ? d?), n.; pl. {Remedies} ( d?z). [L. remedium; pref. re re + mederi to heal, to cure: cf. F. rem[ e]de remedy, rem[ e]dier to remedy. See {Medical}.] [1913 Webster] 1. That which relieves or cures a disease; any medicine or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Remedy of the mint — Remedy Rem e*dy (r?m ? d?), n.; pl. {Remedies} ( d?z). [L. remedium; pref. re re + mederi to heal, to cure: cf. F. rem[ e]de remedy, rem[ e]dier to remedy. See {Medical}.] [1913 Webster] 1. That which relieves or cures a disease; any medicine or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Civil — Civ il, a. [L. civilis, fr. civis citizen: cf. F. civil. See {City}.] 1. Pertaining to a city or state, or to a citizen in his relations to his fellow citizens or to the state; within the city or state. [1913 Webster] 2. Subject to government;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Civil action — Civil Civ il, a. [L. civilis, fr. civis citizen: cf. F. civil. See {City}.] 1. Pertaining to a city or state, or to a citizen in his relations to his fellow citizens or to the state; within the city or state. [1913 Webster] 2. Subject to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Civil architecture — Civil Civ il, a. [L. civilis, fr. civis citizen: cf. F. civil. See {City}.] 1. Pertaining to a city or state, or to a citizen in his relations to his fellow citizens or to the state; within the city or state. [1913 Webster] 2. Subject to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Civil death — Civil Civ il, a. [L. civilis, fr. civis citizen: cf. F. civil. See {City}.] 1. Pertaining to a city or state, or to a citizen in his relations to his fellow citizens or to the state; within the city or state. [1913 Webster] 2. Subject to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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