Circular polarization

Circular polarization
Circular Cir"cu*lar, a. [L. circularis, fr. circulus circle: cf. F. circulaire. See {Circle}.] [1913 Webster] 1. In the form of, or bounded by, a circle; round. [1913 Webster]

2. repeating itself; ending in itself; reverting to the point of beginning; hence, illogical; inconclusive; as, circular reasoning. [1913 Webster]

3. Adhering to a fixed circle of legends; cyclic; hence, mean; inferior. See {Cyclic poets}, under {Cyclic}. [1913 Webster]

Had Virgil been a circular poet, and closely adhered to history, how could the Romans have had Dido? --Dennis. [1913 Webster]

4. Addressed to a circle, or to a number of persons having a common interest; circulated, or intended for circulation; as, a circular letter. [1913 Webster]

A proclamation of Henry III., . . . doubtless circular throughout England. --Hallam. [1913 Webster]

5. Perfect; complete. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

A man so absolute and circular In all those wished-for rarities that may take A virgin captive. --Massinger. [1913 Webster]

{Circular are}, any portion of the circumference of a circle.

{Circular cubics} (Math.), curves of the third order which are imagined to pass through the two circular points at infinity.

{Circular functions}. (Math.) See under {Function}.

{Circular instruments}, mathematical instruments employed for measuring angles, in which the graduation extends round the whole circumference of a circle, or 360[deg].

{Circular lines}, straight lines pertaining to the circle, as sines, tangents, secants, etc.

{Circular note}{ or Circular letter}. (a) (Com.) See under {Credit}. (b) (Diplomacy) A letter addressed in identical terms to a number of persons.

{Circular numbers} (Arith.), those whose powers terminate in the same digits as the roots themselves; as 5 and 6, whose squares are 25 and 36. --Bailey. --Barlow.

{Circular points at infinity} (Geom.), two imaginary points at infinite distance through which every circle in the plane is, in the theory of curves, imagined to pass.

{Circular polarization}. (Min.) See under {Polarization}.

{Circular sailing} or {Globular sailing} (Naut.), the method of sailing by the arc of a great circle.

{Circular saw}. See under {Saw}. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • circular polarization — n polarization in which the mutually perpendicular components of a transverse wave radiation have equal amplitudes but differ in phase by 90 degrees circularly polarized adj …   Medical dictionary

  • Circular polarization — The electric field vectors of a traveling circularly polarized electromagnetic wave. In electrodynamics, circular polarization[1] of an electromagnetic wave is a polarization in which the electric field of the passing wave does not change… …   Wikipedia

  • circular polarization — apskritiminė poliarizacija statusas T sritis fizika atitikmenys: angl. circular polarization; rotary polarization vok. zirkulare Polarisation, f; Zirkularpolarisation, f rus. круговая поляризация, f pranc. polarisation circulaire, f; polarisation …   Fizikos terminų žodynas

  • circular polarization — Optics. polarization in which the vector representing the instantaneous intensity of the electromagnetic field describes a circular helix in the direction of propagation. Cf. elliptical polarization. [1965 70] * * * …   Universalium

  • circular polarization — noun Physics polarization in which either the electric or the magnetic vector of the light rotates in a circle perpendicular to the path of propagation …   English new terms dictionary

  • circular polarization — noun : polarization in which the mutually perpendicular components of a transverse wave radiation have equal amplitudes but differ in phase by 90 degrees • circularly polarized adjective …   Useful english dictionary

  • Circular polarization of starlight — The circular polarization of starlight has been observed to be a function of the linear polarization of starlight.Starlight becomes partially linearly polarized by scattering from elongated interstellar dust grains whose long axes tend to be… …   Wikipedia

  • Circular polarization in nature — Only a few mechanisms in nature are known to systematically produce circularly polarized light. In 1911, Albert Abraham Michelson discovered that light reflected from the golden scarab beetle Plusiotis resplendens is preferentially left handed.… …   Wikipedia

  • Polarization — ( Brit. polarisation) is a property of waves that describes the orientation of their oscillations. For transverse waves, it describes the orientation of the oscillations in the plane perpendicular to the wave s direction of travel. Longitudinal… …   Wikipedia

  • Circular dichroism — (CD) refers to the differential absorption of left and right circularly polarized light.[1][2] This phenomenon was discovered by Jean Baptiste Biot, Augustin Fresnel, and Aimé Cotton in the first half of the 19th century.[3] It is exhibited in… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”