Affect
Affect Af*fect", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Affected}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Affecting}.] [L. affectus, p. p. of afficere to affect by active agency; ad + facere to make: cf. F. affectere, L. affectare, freq. of afficere. See {Fact}.] 1. To act upon; to produce an effect or change upon. [1913 Webster]

As might affect the earth with cold heat. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

The climate affected their health and spirits. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

2. To influence or move, as the feelings or passions; to touch. [1913 Webster]

A consideration of the rationale of our passions seems to me very necessary for all who would affect them upon solid and pure principles. [1913 Webster]

3. To love; to regard with affection. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

As for Queen Katharine, he rather respected than affected, rather honored than loved, her. --Fuller. [1913 Webster]

4. To show a fondness for; to like to use or practice; to choose; hence, to frequent habitually. [1913 Webster]

For he does neither affect company, nor is he fit for it, indeed. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Do not affect the society of your inferiors in rank, nor court that of the great. --Hazlitt. [1913 Webster]

5. To dispose or incline. [1913 Webster]

Men whom they thought best affected to religion and their country's liberty. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

6. To aim at; to aspire; to covet. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

This proud man affects imperial ?way. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

7. To tend to by affinity or disposition. [1913 Webster]

The drops of every fluid affect a round figure. --Newton. [1913 Webster]

8. To make a show of; to put on a pretense of; to feign; to assume; as, to affect ignorance. [1913 Webster]

Careless she is with artful care, Affecting to seem unaffected. --Congreve. [1913 Webster]

Thou dost affect my manners. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

9. To assign; to appoint. [R.] [1913 Webster]

One of the domestics was affected to his special service. --Thackeray. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To influence; operate; act on; concern; move; melt; soften; subdue; overcome; pretend; assume. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • affect — [ afɛkt ] n. m. • 1908; all. Affekt; a. fr. et XVIe « état, disposition »; du lat. affectus, comme l all. ♦ Psychol. État affectif élémentaire. Les sensations et les affects. ● affect nom masculin (allemand Affekt) Processus de décharge de l… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • affect — simulate, *assume, pretend, feign, counterfeit, sham affect 1 Affect, influence, touch, impress, strike, sway are more or less closely synonymous when they mean to produce or to have an effect upon a person or upon a thing capable of a reaction.… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • affect — affect, effect 1. These two words are often confused. It should be remembered that effect is most common as a noun meaning ‘a result or consequence’ • (In England, at any rate, education produces no effect whatsoever Oscar Wilde) and that affect… …   Modern English usage

  • affect — Ⅰ. affect [1] ► VERB 1) make a difference to; have an effect on. 2) touch the feelings of. DERIVATIVES affecting adjective. USAGE Affect and effect are frequently confused …   English terms dictionary

  • affect — I verb act on, adficere, bear upon, cause to alter, cause to vary, change, commovere, conduce, exert influence, have an effect upon, have influence, impress, induce, influence, introduce a change, make a change, play a direct part, prevail upon,… …   Law dictionary

  • affect — [v1] influence, affect emotionally act on, alter, change, disturb, impinge, impress, induce, influence, inspire, interest, involve, modify, move, overcome, perturb, prevail, regard, relate, stir, sway, touch, transform, upset; concepts… …   New thesaurus

  • affect — affect1 [ə fekt′; ] for n. [ 2, af′ekt΄] vt. [ME affecten < L affectare, to strive after < affectus, pp. of afficere, to influence, attack < ad , to + facere, DO1] 1. to have an effect on; influence; produce a change in [bright light… …   English World dictionary

  • Affect — Af*fect ([a^]f*f[e^]kt ), n. [L. affectus.] 1. Affection; inclination; passion; feeling; disposition. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. (Psychotherapy) The emotional complex associated with an idea or mental state. In hysteria, the affect is… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • affect — affect, affective, affectivity An affect is an emotion. In sociology the use of the term generally implies that an action is being or has been carried out for emotional gratification. For example, in their discussion of Class Awareness in the… …   Dictionary of sociology

  • Affect — (v. lat.), schnell entstehende, lebhafte, ein bemerkliches Streben durch Aufhebung des Gleichgewichts im Gemüth hervorbringende, auf die Functionen des Geistes u. Körpers sichtbaren Einfluß habende Gemüthsbewegung. A. entsteht, wenn eine… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

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