Chiefest
Chiefest Chief"est, a. [Superl. of {Chief}.] First or foremost; chief; principal. [Archaic] ``Our chiefest courtier.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

The chiefest among ten thousand. --Canticles v. 10. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • JERUSALEM — The entry is arranged according to the following outline: history name protohistory the bronze age david and first temple period second temple period the roman period byzantine jerusalem arab period crusader period mamluk period …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Albe — Al be , Albee Al bee , conj. [See {Albeit}.] Although; albeit. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Albe Clarissa were their chiefest founderess. Spenser. [1913 Webster] || …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Albee — Albe Al be , Albee Al bee , conj. [See {Albeit}.] Although; albeit. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Albe Clarissa were their chiefest founderess. Spenser. [1913 Webster] || …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Behind — Be*hind , prep. [AS. behindan; pref. be + hindan. See {Hind}, a.] 1. On the side opposite the front or nearest part; on the back side of; at the back of; on the other side of; as, behind a door; behind a hill. [1913 Webster] A tall Brabanter,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bob — (b[o^]b), n. [An onomatopoetic word, expressing quick, jerky motion; OE. bob bunch, bobben to strike, mock, deceive. Cf. Prov. Eng. bob, n., a ball, an engine beam, bunch, blast, trick, taunt, scoff; as, a v., to dance, to courtesy, to disappoint …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • By the stern — Stern Stern, n. [Icel. stj[=o]rn a steering, or a doubtful AS. ste[ o]rn. [root]166. See {Steer}, v. t.] 1. The helm or tiller of a vessel or boat; also, the rudder. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] 2. (Naut.) The after or rear end of a ship or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rational — Ra tion*al (r[a^]sh [u^]n*al), a. [L. rationalis: cf. F. rationnel. See {Ratio}, {Reason}, and cf. {Rationale}.] 1. Relating to the reason; not physical; mental. [1913 Webster] Moral philosophy was his chiefest end; for the rational, the natural …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rational horizon — Rational Ra tion*al (r[a^]sh [u^]n*al), a. [L. rationalis: cf. F. rationnel. See {Ratio}, {Reason}, and cf. {Rationale}.] 1. Relating to the reason; not physical; mental. [1913 Webster] Moral philosophy was his chiefest end; for the rational, the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rational quantity — Rational Ra tion*al (r[a^]sh [u^]n*al), a. [L. rationalis: cf. F. rationnel. See {Ratio}, {Reason}, and cf. {Rationale}.] 1. Relating to the reason; not physical; mental. [1913 Webster] Moral philosophy was his chiefest end; for the rational, the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rational symptom — Rational Ra tion*al (r[a^]sh [u^]n*al), a. [L. rationalis: cf. F. rationnel. See {Ratio}, {Reason}, and cf. {Rationale}.] 1. Relating to the reason; not physical; mental. [1913 Webster] Moral philosophy was his chiefest end; for the rational, the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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