Charge and discharge
Charge Charge, n. [F. charge, fr. charger to load. See {Charge}, v. t., and cf. {Cargo}, {Caricature}.] 1. A load or burder laid upon a person or thing. [1913 Webster]

2. A person or thing commited or intrusted to the care, custody, or management of another; a trust. [1913 Webster]

Note: The people of a parish or church are called the charge of the clergyman who is set over them. [1913 Webster]

3. Custody or care of any person, thing, or place; office; responsibility; oversight; obigation; duty. [1913 Webster]

'Tis a great charge to come under one body's hand. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

4. Heed; care; anxiety; trouble. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

5. Harm. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

6. An order; a mandate or command; an injunction. [1913 Webster]

The king gave cherge concerning Absalom. --2. Sam. xviii. 5. [1913 Webster]

7. An address (esp. an earnest or impressive address) containing instruction or exhortation; as, the charge of a judge to a jury; the charge of a bishop to his clergy. [1913 Webster]

8. An accusation of a wrong of offense; allegation; indictment; specification of something alleged. [1913 Webster]

The charge of confounding very different classes of phenomena. --Whewell. [1913 Webster]

9. Whatever constitutes a burden on property, as rents, taxes, lines, etc.; costs; expense incurred; -- usually in the plural. [1913 Webster]

10. The price demanded for a thing or service. [1913 Webster]

11. An entry or a account of that which is due from one party to another; that which is debited in a business transaction; as, a charge in an account book. [1913 Webster]

12. That quantity, as of ammunition, electricity, ore, fuel, etc., which any apparatus, as a gun, battery, furnace, machine, etc., is intended to receive and fitted to hold, or which is actually in it at one time [1913 Webster]

13. The act of rushing upon, or towards, an enemy; a sudden onset or attack, as of troops, esp. cavalry; hence, the signal for attack; as, to sound the charge. [1913 Webster]

Never, in any other war afore, gave the Romans a hotter charge upon the enemies. --Holland. [1913 Webster]

The charge of the light brigade. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

14. A position (of a weapon) fitted for attack; as, to bring a weapon to the charge. [1913 Webster]

15. (Far.) A sort of plaster or ointment. [1913 Webster]

16. (Her.) A bearing. See {Bearing}, n., 8. [1913 Webster]

17. [Cf. {Charre}.] Thirty-six pigs of lead, each pig weighing about seventy pounds; -- called also {charre}. [1913 Webster]

18. Weight; import; value. [1913 Webster]

Many suchlike ``as's'' of great charge. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{Back charge}. See under {Back}, a.

{Bursting charge}. (a) (Mil.) The charge which bursts a shell, etc. (b) (Mining) A small quantity of fine powder to secure the ignition of a charge of coarse powder in blasting.

{Charge and discharge} (Equity Practice), the old mode or form of taking an account before a master in chancery.

{Charge sheet}, the paper on which are entered at a police station all arrests and accusations.

{To sound the charge}, to give the signal for an attack.

Syn: Care; custody; trust; management; office; expense; cost; price; assault; attack; onset; injunction; command; order; mandate; instruction; accusation; indictment. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Charge and discharge — Discharge Dis*charge , n. [Cf. F. d[ e]charge. See {Discharge}, v. t.] 1. The act of discharging; the act of relieving of a charge or load; removal of a load or burden; unloading; as, the discharge of a ship; discharge of a cargo. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • charge and discharge — Under former equity practice, in taking an account before a master, a written statement of items for which plaintiff asked credit and a counterstatement, exhibiting claims or demands defendant held against plaintiff …   Black's law dictionary

  • charge and discharge — Under former equity practice, in taking an account before a master, a written statement of items for which plaintiff asked credit and a counterstatement, exhibiting claims or demands defendant held against plaintiff …   Black's law dictionary

  • charge and discharge — The complainant s delivery of his account to the master in chancery and the defendant s filing of his defense thereto …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • Charge And Discharge Statement — An accounting statement for an account or estate over which someone has fiduciary responsibility. Charge and Discharge statements ultimately reconcile all distributions of income and principal going into and out of the account or estate. Thus the …   Investment dictionary

  • charge and discharge accounting — A form of accounting used in the manorial system of the Middle Ages, in which individuals charge themselves with sums or estate they should receive and credit themselves with sums paid out …   Accounting dictionary

  • Discharge — Dis*charge , n. [Cf. F. d[ e]charge. See {Discharge}, v. t.] 1. The act of discharging; the act of relieving of a charge or load; removal of a load or burden; unloading; as, the discharge of a ship; discharge of a cargo. [1913 Webster] 2. Firing… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Charge — Charge, n. [F. charge, fr. charger to load. See {Charge}, v. t., and cf. {Cargo}, {Caricature}.] 1. A load or burder laid upon a person or thing. [1913 Webster] 2. A person or thing commited or intrusted to the care, custody, or management of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Charge sheet — Charge Charge, n. [F. charge, fr. charger to load. See {Charge}, v. t., and cf. {Cargo}, {Caricature}.] 1. A load or burder laid upon a person or thing. [1913 Webster] 2. A person or thing commited or intrusted to the care, custody, or management …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • charge — verb To impose a burden, duty, obligation, or lien; to create a claim against property; to assess; to demand; to accuse; to instruct a jury on matters of law. To impose a tax, duty, or trust. To entrust with responsibilities and duties (e.g. care …   Black's law dictionary

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