Chard Chard (ch[aum]rd), n. [Cf. F. carde esculent thistle.] 1. The tender leaves or leafstalks of the artichoke, white beet, etc., blanched for table use. [1913 Webster]

2. A variety of the white beet, which produces large, succulent leaves and leafstalks. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Chard — Chard …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • chard — chard; fau·chard; lie·ber·mann bur·chard; or·chard; or·chard·ing; or·chard·man; pil·chard; po·chard; clo·chard; flan·chard; poa·chard; …   English syllables

  • Chard — País …   Wikipedia Español

  • chard — [chärd] n. [earlier card < Fr carde < L carduus, thistle, artichoke (see CARD2): sp. infl. by Fr chardon, artichoke] a kind of beet (Beta vulgaris var. cicla) whose large leaves and thick stalks are used as food; Swiss chard …   English World dictionary

  • chard — (n.) 1650s, from Fr. carde chard, from L. carduus thistle, artichoke …   Etymology dictionary

  • chard — ► NOUN (also Swiss chard) ▪ a beet of a variety with edible broad white leaf stalks and green blades. ORIGIN French carde …   English terms dictionary

  • Chard — (spr. Tschard), Marktflecken in der englischen Grafschaft Somersett; altgothisches Rathhaus; die größten Kartoffelmärkte in England; 5800 Ew …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Chard — (spr. tschārd), Stadt (municipal borough) in der engl. Grafschaft Somerset, an der Grenze von Devonshire, mit (1901) 4437 Einw., hat zwei Eisengießereien, berühmte Spitzenfabrikation und eine Lateinschule. 6 km davon Ford Abbey, ein ehemaliges… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • chard — [tʃa:d US tʃa:rd] n [U] [Date: 1600 1700; : French; Origin: carde, from Latin cardus; CARD2] a vegetable with large leaves …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • chard — [ tʃard ] noun uncount a vegetable with white stems and large dark green leaves …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

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