Chapping
Chap Chap (ch[a^]p or ch[o^]p), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Chapped} (ch[a^]pt or ch[o^]pt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Chapping}.] [See {Chop} to cut.] 1. To cause to open in slits or chinks; to split; to cause the skin of to crack or become rough. [1913 Webster]

Then would unbalanced heat licentious reign, Crack the dry hill, and chap the russet plain. --Blackmore. [1913 Webster]

Nor winter's blast chap her fair face. --Lyly. [1913 Webster]

2. To strike; to beat. [Scot.] [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • chapping — tʃæp n. rift, gap, breach; guy, fellow v. be cracked or split; crack, split …   English contemporary dictionary

  • chapping —    DARE: 1910.    1) A competition of sorts in which two cowpokes take turns slapping each other with leather chaps. The first to give up is the loser.    2) A punishment in which a man is beat with leather chaps …   Vocabulario Vaquero

  • chapping — present part of chap …   Useful english dictionary

  • Chapped lips — Dry, cracked or sore lips, usually in cold, windy, dry weather and less often in warm weather. Sun exposure can contribute to chapping of the lips. Licking or biting the lips does not help the situation. The lips are more sensitive to chapping… …   Medical dictionary

  • Chap — (ch[a^]p or ch[o^]p), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Chapped} (ch[a^]pt or ch[o^]pt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Chapping}.] [See {Chop} to cut.] 1. To cause to open in slits or chinks; to split; to cause the skin of to crack or become rough. [1913 Webster] Then… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Chapped — Chap Chap (ch[a^]p or ch[o^]p), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Chapped} (ch[a^]pt or ch[o^]pt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Chapping}.] [See {Chop} to cut.] 1. To cause to open in slits or chinks; to split; to cause the skin of to crack or become rough. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • chap — I. noun Etymology: Middle English chappes, plural, from chappen Date: 14th century a crack in or a sore roughening of the skin caused by exposure to wind or cold II. verb (chapped; chapping) Etymology: Middle English chappen; akin to Middle Dutch …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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