chanter
Hedge Hedge, n. [OE. hegge, AS. hecg; akin to haga an inclosure, E. haw, AS. hege hedge, E. haybote, D. hegge, OHG. hegga, G. hecke. [root]12. See {Haw} a hedge.] A thicket of bushes, usually thorn bushes; especially, such a thicket planted as a fence between any two portions of land; and also any sort of shrubbery, as evergreens, planted in a line or as a fence; particularly, such a thicket planted round a field to fence it, or in rows to separate the parts of a garden. [1913 Webster]

The roughest berry on the rudest hedge. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Through the verdant maze Of sweetbrier hedges I pursue my walk. --Thomson. [1913 Webster]

Note: Hedge, when used adjectively or in composition, often means rustic, outlandish, illiterate, poor, or mean; as, hedge priest; hedgeborn, etc. [1913 Webster]

{Hedge bells}, {Hedge bindweed} (Bot.), a climbing plant related to the morning-glory ({Convolvulus sepium}).

{Hedge bill}, a long-handled billhook.

{Hedge garlic} (Bot.), a plant of the genus {Alliaria}. See {Garlic mustard}, under {Garlic}.

{Hedge hyssop} (Bot.), a bitter herb of the genus {Gratiola}, the leaves of which are emetic and purgative.

{Hedge marriage}, a secret or clandestine marriage, especially one performed by a hedge priest. [Eng.]

{Hedge mustard} (Bot.), a plant of the genus {Sisymbrium}, belonging to the Mustard family.

{Hedge nettle} (Bot.), an herb, or under shrub, of the genus {Stachys}, belonging to the Mint family. It has a nettlelike appearance, though quite harmless.

{Hedge note}. (a) The note of a hedge bird. (b) Low, contemptible writing. [Obs.] --Dryden.

{Hedge priest}, a poor, illiterate priest. --Shak.

{Hedge school}, an open-air school in the shelter of a hedge, in Ireland; a school for rustics.

{Hedge sparrow} (Zo["o]l.), a European warbler ({Accentor modularis}) which frequents hedges. Its color is reddish brown, and ash; the wing coverts are tipped with white. Called also {chanter}, {hedge warbler}, {dunnock}, and {doney}.

{Hedge writer}, an insignificant writer, or a writer of low, scurrilous stuff. [Obs.] --Swift.

{To breast up a hedge}. See under {Breast}.

{To hang in the hedge}, to be at a standstill. ``While the business of money hangs in the hedge.'' --Pepys. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • chanter — [ ʃɑ̃te ] v. <conjug. : 1> • Xe; lat. cantare, fréquent. de canere I ♦ V. intr. 1 ♦ Former avec la voix une suite de sons musicaux. ⇒ moduler, vocaliser; 1. chant. Chanter bien, avec expression. Chanter à livre ouvert. ⇒ déchiffrer, solfier …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • chanter — 1. (chan té) v. n. 1°   Faire entendre un chant. Chanter juste. Chanter au lutrin. Maître à chanter. •   Une femme chantait : C était bien de chansons qu alors il s agissait ! Dame mouche s en va chanter à leurs oreilles, LA FONT. Fabl. VII, 9.… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • chanter — CHANTER. v. a. Former avec la voix une suite de sons variés, selon les règles de la musique. Chanter bien. Chanter juste, agréablement, passablement. Chanter a pleine voix. Chanter faux. Chanter à basse note. Il alloit chantant par les chemins.… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • chanter — Chanter. v. act. Pousser la voix avec differente inflexion & harmonie. Il chante bien. il chante juste, agreablement, passablement. chanter à pleine voix. chanter faux. chanter à basse note. il alloit chantant par les chemins. chanter la grande… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • chanter — Chanter, Canere, Cantare, Occinere, Praecinere, Psallere. Qui apprend autruy à chanter, Vocis et cantus modulator, Phonascus, Musicus. Chanter apres un autre, Recantare. Chanter en joüant de fleustes, Canere ad tibiam. Chanter de la gorge… …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • Chanter — Chant er (ch[.a]nt [ e]r), n. [Cf. F. chanteur.] 1. One who chants; a singer or songster. Pope. [1913 Webster] 2. The chief singer of the chantry. J. Gregory. [1913 Webster] 3. The flute or finger pipe in a bagpipe. See {Bagpipe}. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • chanter — [chan′tər, chän′tər] n. 1. one who chants or sings, esp. as in a choir; chorister 2. a priest who sang Masses in a chantry 3. that pipe of a bagpipe with finger holes on which the melody is played …   English World dictionary

  • CHANTER — v. n. Former avec la voix une suite de sons variés, selon les règles de la musique. Chanter bien. Chanter avec goût. Chanter juste, agréablement, passablement. Chanter à pleine voix. Chanter faux. Chanter à basse note. Il allait chantant par les… …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 7eme edition (1835)

  • CHANTER — v. intr. Former avec la voix une suite de sons variés, selon les règles de la musique. Chanter bien. Chanter avec goût. Chanter juste, agréablement, passablement. Chanter à pleine voix. Chanter faux. Chanter en musique. Chanter en faux bourdon.… …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 8eme edition (1935)

  • Chanter — This article is on the bagpipe part; for the musical office, see Cantor. For people named Chanter, see Chanter (surname). The chanter of the Great Highland bagpipe. The chanter is the part of the bagpipe upon which the player creates the melody.… …   Wikipedia

  • Chanter — Chanterelle (musique) Pour les articles homonymes, voir Chanterelle (homonymie). La chanterelle, le chanter ou flûte, ou chalumeau, ou lévriad (en breton) est un cône (parfois un cylindre) percé de trous permettant l exécution d une mélodie sur… …   Wikipédia en Français

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”