Centripetal impression
Centripetal Cen*trip"e*tal, a. [L. centrum center + petere to move toward.] 1. Tending, or causing, to approach the center. [1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) (a) Expanding first at the base of the inflorescence, and proceeding in order towards the summit. (b) Having the radicle turned toward the axis of the fruit, as some embryos. [1913 Webster]

3. Progressing by changes from the exterior of a thing toward its center; as, the centripetal calcification of a bone. --R. Owen. [1913 Webster]

{Centripetal force} (Mech.), a force whose direction is towards a center, as in case of a planet revolving round the sun, the center of the system, See {Centrifugal force}, under {Centrifugal}.

{Centripetal impression} (Physiol.), an impression (sensory) transmitted by an afferent nerve from the exterior of the body inwards, to the central organ. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Centripetal — Cen*trip e*tal, a. [L. centrum center + petere to move toward.] 1. Tending, or causing, to approach the center. [1913 Webster] 2. (Bot.) (a) Expanding first at the base of the inflorescence, and proceeding in order towards the summit. (b) Having… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Centripetal force — Centripetal Cen*trip e*tal, a. [L. centrum center + petere to move toward.] 1. Tending, or causing, to approach the center. [1913 Webster] 2. (Bot.) (a) Expanding first at the base of the inflorescence, and proceeding in order towards the summit …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • centripetal theory of hallucinatory activity —    The name centripetal theory refers to an explanatory model of hallucinatory activity which is traditionally attributed to the German physiologist and zoologist Johannes Peter Müller (18011858). Conceptually, the centripetal theory constitutes… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • Centrifugal impression — Centrifugal Cen*trif u*gal, a. [L. centrum center + fugere to flee.] 1. Tending, or causing, to recede from the center. [1913 Webster] 2. (Bot.) (a) Expanding first at the summit, and later at the base, as a flower cluster. (b) Having the radicle …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • Centrifugal — Cen*trif u*gal, a. [L. centrum center + fugere to flee.] 1. Tending, or causing, to recede from the center. [1913 Webster] 2. (Bot.) (a) Expanding first at the summit, and later at the base, as a flower cluster. (b) Having the radicle turned… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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