Cawed
Caw \Caw\ (k[add]), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Cawed} (k[add]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Cawing}.] [Imitative. [root]22 Cf. {Chough}.] To cry like a crow, rook, or raven. [1913 Webster]

Rising and cawing at the gun's report. --Shak. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • cawed — var. of coed, affected with sheep rot …   Useful english dictionary

  • cawed — cod …   American English homophones

  • cawed — kɔː n. screech of a crow v. screech like a crow …   English contemporary dictionary

  • cod — cawed …   American English homophones

  • Rhotic and non-rhotic accents — English pronunciation can be divided into two main accent groups: a rhotic (pronounced /ˈroʊtɨk/, sometimes /ˈrɒtɨk/) speaker pronounces a rhotic consonant in words like hard; a non rhotic speaker does not. That is, rhotic speakers pronounce /r/… …   Wikipedia

  • caw — [[t]kɔ͟ː[/t]] caws, cawing, cawed VERB When a bird such as a crow or a rook caws, it makes a loud harsh sound. Outside, a raven cawed again and then there was silence …   English dictionary

  • caw — UK [kɔː] / US [kɔ] verb [intransitive] Word forms caw : present tense I/you/we/they caw he/she/it caws present participle cawing past tense cawed past participle cawed when crows (= large black birds) caw, they make a loud unpleasant sound… …   English dictionary

  • Caw — (k[add]), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Cawed} (k[add]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Cawing}.] [Imitative. [root]22 Cf. {Chough}.] To cry like a crow, rook, or raven. [1913 Webster] Rising and cawing at the gun s report. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cawing — Caw Caw (k[add]), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Cawed} (k[add]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Cawing}.] [Imitative. [root]22 Cf. {Chough}.] To cry like a crow, rook, or raven. [1913 Webster] Rising and cawing at the gun s report. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Phonological history of English low back vowels — The phonology of the low back vowels of the English language has undergone changes both overall and with regional variations, dating from Late Middle English (c. 1400) to the present. The sound changes heard in modern English mostly begin with… …   Wikipedia

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