Caulicle
Caulicle Cau"li*cle, n. (Bot.) A short caulis or stem, esp. the rudimentary stem seen in the embryo of a seed; -- otherwise called a {radicle}. [1913 Webster] ||

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • caulicle — [kô′li kəl] n. 〚L cauliculus, dim. of caulis, a stem: see HOLE〛 Bot. a small or rudimentary stem, as in an embryo * * * …   Universalium

  • caulicle — [kô′li kəl] n. [L cauliculus, dim. of caulis, a stem: see HOLE] Bot. a small or rudimentary stem, as in an embryo …   English World dictionary

  • caulicle — noun A small stalk or stem, especially the rudimentary stalk of a seed embryo …   Wiktionary

  • caulicle — cau|li|cle Mot Pla Nom masculí …   Diccionari Català-Català

  • caulicle — cau·li·cle …   English syllables

  • caulicle — /ˈkɔlɪkəl/ (say kawlikuhl) noun Botany a small or rudimentary stem. {Latin cauliculus, diminutive of caulis stalk} …   Australian English dictionary

  • caulicle — ˈkȯlə̇kəl noun ( s) Etymology: Latin cauliculus, diminutive of caulis stem, stalk more at cole : a rudimentary stem; specifically : the stem of an embryo or young seedling …   Useful english dictionary

  • radicle — Caulicle Cau li*cle, n. (Bot.) A short caulis or stem, esp. the rudimentary stem seen in the embryo of a seed; otherwise called a {radicle}. [1913 Webster] || …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scapel — ˈskapəl noun ( s) Etymology: New Latin scapellus, diminutive of Latin scapus stalk more at shaft : caulicle * * * ˈscapel Bot. rare. [ad. mod.L. scāpellus (Lindley …   Useful english dictionary

  • Accumbent — Ac*cum bent ( bent), a. 1. Leaning or reclining, as the ancients did at their meals. [1913 Webster] The Roman . . . accumbent posture in eating. Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster] 2. (Bot.) Lying against anything, as one part of a leaf against another… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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