Catch Catch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Caught}or {Catched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Catching}. Catched is rarely used.] [OE. cacchen, OF. cachier, dialectic form of chacier to hunt, F. chasser, fr. (assumend) LL. captiare, for L. capture, V. intens. of capere to take, catch. See {Capacious}, and cf. {Chase}, {Case} a box.] [1913 Webster] 1. To lay hold on; to seize, especially with the hand; to grasp (anything) in motion, with the effect of holding; as, to catch a ball. [1913 Webster]

2. To seize after pursuing; to arrest; as, to catch a thief. ``They pursued . . . and caught him.'' --Judg. i. 6. [1913 Webster]

3. To take captive, as in a snare or net, or on a hook; as, to catch a bird or fish. [1913 Webster]

4. Hence: To insnare; to entangle. ``To catch him in his words''. --Mark xii. 13. [1913 Webster]

5. To seize with the senses or the mind; to apprehend; as, to catch a melody. ``Fiery thoughts . . . whereof I catch the issue.'' --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

6. To communicate to; to fasten upon; as, the fire caught the adjoining building. [1913 Webster]

7. To engage and attach; to please; to charm. [1913 Webster]

The soothing arts that catch the fair. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

8. To get possession of; to attain. [1913 Webster]

Torment myself to catch the English throne. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

9. To take or receive; esp. to take by sympathy, contagion, infection, or exposure; as, to catch the spirit of an occasion; to catch the measles or smallpox; to catch cold; the house caught fire. [1913 Webster]

10. To come upon unexpectedly or by surprise; to find; as, to catch one in the act of stealing. [1913 Webster]

11. To reach in time; to come up with; as, to catch a train. [1913 Webster]

{To catch fire}, to become inflamed or ignited.

{to catch it} to get a scolding or beating; to suffer punishment. [Colloq.]

{To catch one's eye}, to interrupt captiously while speaking. [Colloq.] ``You catch me up so very short.'' --Dickens.

{To catch up}, to snatch; to take up suddenly. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Caught — is a method of dismissing a batsman in the sport of cricket. Being out caught is the most common method of dismissal. This method of dismissal is covered by Law 32 of the Laws of cricket which reads: A batsman is out caught if a fielder catches… …   Wikipedia

  • Caught — (k[add]t), imp. & p. p. of {Catch}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • caught — caught; un·caught; …   English syllables

  • caught — index arrested (apprehended) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • caught — UK US /kɔːt/ verb ► the past tense and past participle of CATCH(Cf. ↑catch) verb …   Financial and business terms

  • caught — [ko:t US ko:t] the past tense and past participle of ↑catch …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • caught — the past tense and past participle of catch1 …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • caught — p.t. and pp. of CATCH (Cf. catch) (q.v.) …   Etymology dictionary

  • caught — [kôt] vt., vi. [ME cahte, cauhte] pt. & pp. of CATCH …   English World dictionary

  • Caught — Filmdaten Deutscher Titel Caught – Im Netz der Leidenschaft Originaltitel Caught …   Deutsch Wikipedia

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