Carryk
Carryk \Car"ryk\, n. A carack. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Carrick — This is a very early Scottish locational surname. Recorded in the modern spellings of Carreck and Carrick, it originates from a district called Carrick in the county of Ayrshire. The place name derives from the ancient pre 10th century Gaelic… …   Surnames reference

  • carrick bend — noun Etymology: probably from obsolete English carrick carrack, from Middle English carrake, carryk Date: 1819 a knot used to join the ends of two large ropes see knot illustration …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Geoffrey Chaucer — Chaucer redirects here. For other uses, see Chaucer (disambiguation). Geoffrey Chaucer …   Wikipedia

  • Geoffrey Chaucer — Nacimiento c. 1343 …   Wikipedia Español

  • carrick bend — /kar ik/ a knot or bend for joining the ends of two ropes. See illus. under knot. [1810 20; perh. to be identified with ME carryk, var. of carrake CARRACK] * * * …   Universalium

  • Carrack — This surname is of either medieval Scottish or English origin, and is a locational name from the ancient district of Carrick in Ayrshire, or from Carrock Fell in Cumberland. The latter place was recorded as Carroc in a Calendar of Documents… …   Surnames reference

  • Carreck — This is a dialectually transposed locational name from a district called Carrick in Ayrshire (Scotland). The name derives from the Gaelic carraig meaning a rock , and is first recorded in the early twelve hundreds. Alternate spellings have… …   Surnames reference

  • carrick bend — car′rick bend [[t]ˈkær ɪk[/t]] n. naut. tex a knot or bend for joining the ends of two ropes • Etymology: 1810–20; perh. to be identified with ME carryk, var. of carrake carrack …   From formal English to slang

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