Carbon Car"bon (k[aum]r"b[o^]n), n. [F. carbone, fr. L. carbo coal; cf. Skr. [,c]r[=a] to cook.] (Chem.) 1. An elementary substance, not metallic in its nature, which is present in all organic compounds. Atomic weight 11.97. Symbol C. it is combustible, and forms the base of lampblack and charcoal, and enters largely into mineral coals. In its pure crystallized state it constitutes the diamond, the hardest of known substances, occuring in monometric crystals like the octahedron, etc. Another modification is graphite, or blacklead, and in this it is soft, and occurs in hexagonal prisms or tables. When united with oxygen it forms carbon dioxide, commonly called carbonic acid, or carbonic oxide, according to the proportions of the oxygen; when united with hydrogen, it forms various compounds called hydrocarbons. Compare {Diamond}, and {Graphite}. [1913 Webster]

2. (Elec.) A carbon rod or pencil used in an arc lamp; also, a plate or piece of carbon used as one of the elements of a voltaic battery. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

3. a sheet of carbon paper. [PJC]

4. a carbon copy. [PJC]

{Carbon compounds}, {Compounds of carbon} (Chem.), those compounds consisting largely of carbon, commonly produced by animals and plants, and hence called organic compounds, though their synthesis may be effected in many cases in the laboratory. [1913 Webster]

The formation of the compounds of carbon is not dependent upon the life process. --I. Remsen

{carbon copy}, originally, a copy of a document made by use of a {carbon paper}, but now used generally to refer to any copy of a document made by a mechanical process, such as xerographic copying.

{Carbon dioxide}, {Carbon monoxide}. (Chem.) See under {Carbonic}.

{Carbon light} (Elec.), an extremely brilliant electric light produced by passing a galvanic current through two carbon points kept constantly with their apexes neary in contact.

{Carbon point} (Elec.), a small cylinder or bit of gas carbon moved forward by clockwork so that, as it is burned away by the electric current, it shall constantly maintain its proper relation to the opposing point.

{Carbon paper}, a thin type of paper coated with a dark-colored waxy substance which can be transferred to another sheet of paper underneath it by pressing on the carbon paper. It is used by placing a sheet between two sheets of ordinary writing paper, and then writing or typing on the top sheet, by which process a copy of the writing or typing is transferred to the second sheet below, making a copy without the need for writing or typing a second time. Multiple sheets may be used, with a carbon paper placed above each plain paper to which an impression is to be transferred. In 1997 such paper was still used, particularly to make multiple copies of filled-in purchase invoice forms, but in most applications this technique has been superseded by the more faithful xerographic reproduction and computerized printing processes.

{Carbon tissue}, paper coated with gelatine and pigment, used in the autotype process of photography. --Abney.

{Gas carbon}, a compact variety of carbon obtained as an incrustation on the interior of gas retorts, and used for the manufacture of the carbon rods of pencils for the voltaic, arc, and for the plates of voltaic batteries, etc. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Carbon — (), but as most compounds with multiple single bonded oxygens on a single carbon it is unstable.] Cyanide (CN–), has a similar structure, but behaves much like a halide ion (pseudohalogen). For example it can form the nitride cyanogen molecule… …   Wikipedia

  • carbon — CARBÓN s.n. Element chimic, metaloid foarte răspândit în natură, component de bază al tuturor substanţelor organice, care se găseşte în cărbuni, în petrol, în gaze etc., iar în stare elementară în diamant, în grafit şi în cărbunele negru. ♢… …   Dicționar Român

  • Carbon — steht für: Kohlenstoff, chemisches Element Karbon, Erdzeitalter, die fünfte geochronologische Periode des Paläozoikums von vor etwa 359,2 Millionen Jahren bis vor etwa 299 Millionen Jahren Kohlenstofffaserverstärkter Kunststoff Carbon (Apple),… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • carbon — UK US /ˈkɑːbən/ noun ► [U] NATURAL RESOURCES a chemical element (= simple chemical substance), which exists in all plants and animals, and is an important part of coal and oil. When carbon is burned it produces carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide …   Financial and business terms

  • carbón — (Del lat. carbo, ōnis). 1. m. Materia sólida, ligera, negra y muy combustible, que resulta de la destilación o de la combustión incompleta de la leña o de otros cuerpos orgánicos. 2. carbón de piedra. 3. Brasa o ascua después de apagada. 4.… …   Diccionario de la lengua española

  • carbon — [kär′bən] n. [Fr carbone < L carbo (gen. carbonis), coal < IE base * ker , to burn > HEARTH] 1. a nonmetallic chemical element found in many inorganic compounds and all organic compounds: diamond and graphite are pure carbon; carbon is… …   English World dictionary

  • Carbon — Carbon, IN U.S. town in Indiana Population (2000): 334 Housing Units (2000): 136 Land area (2000): 0.158337 sq. miles (0.410090 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 0.158337 sq. miles (0.410090 sq.… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • carbon — non metallic element, 1789, coined 1787 in French by Lavoisier as charbone, from L. carbo (gen. carbonis) glowing coal, charcoal, from PIE root *ker heat, fire, to burn (Cf. L. cremare to burn; Skt. krsna black, burnt, kudayati singes; Lith.… …   Etymology dictionary

  • carbón — sustantivo masculino 1. Combustible sólido y negro que se obtiene por destilación o combustión incompleta de diferentes fuentes como huesos o leña y arde con facilidad. carbón animal. carbón vegetal o carbón de leña. 2. Combustible mineral fósil… …   Diccionario Salamanca de la Lengua Española

  • carbón — carbón, se acabó el carbón expr. acabado, concluido. ❙ «A éstos se les acabó el carbón.» Francisco Nieva, La carroza de plomo candente, 1976, RAE CREA. ❙ «Pues ya me he hartado. Se acabó el carbón.» Ramón Ayerra, La lucha inútil, 1984, RAE CREA.… …   Diccionario del Argot "El Sohez"

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