Adread
Adread A*dread", v. t. & i. [AS. andr[ae]dan, ondr[ae]; pref. a- (for and against) + dr[ae]den to dread. See {Dread}.] To dread. [Obs.] --Sir P. Sidney. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • adread — /ə dredˈ/ (obsolete) transitive verb (pat adradˈ (Spenser)) To fear ORIGIN: OE ondrǣdan, from pfx on , and against, and drǣdan to dread …   Useful english dictionary

  • adread — v. n. == fear, be in dread. O. and N. 1264 adj. == in fear. Rel. S. iv. 2. part. ‘adrad.’ 44 B …   Oldest English Words

  • Adrad — A*drad , p. a. [P. p. of adread.] Put in dread; afraid. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dread — [12] Old English had the verb ondrǣdan ‘fear’. Its first syllable is generally taken to be the prefix *and ‘against’, which is related to German ent ‘away, un ’ and Greek anti (source of English anti ) and appears also in English answer. The… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • dread — [12] Old English had the verb ondrǣdan ‘fear’. Its first syllable is generally taken to be the prefix *and ‘against’, which is related to German ent ‘away, un ’ and Greek anti (source of English anti ) and appears also in English answer. The… …   Word origins

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