canon of the Mass
Ordinary Or"di*na*ry, n.; pl. {Ordinaries} (-r[i^]z). 1. (Law) (a) (Roman Law) An officer who has original jurisdiction in his own right, and not by deputation. (b) (Eng. Law) One who has immediate jurisdiction in matters ecclesiastical; an ecclesiastical judge; also, a deputy of the bishop, or a clergyman appointed to perform divine service for condemned criminals and assist in preparing them for death. (c) (Am. Law) A judicial officer, having generally the powers of a judge of probate or a surrogate. [1913 Webster]

2. The mass; the common run. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

I see no more in you than in the ordinary Of nature's salework. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. That which is so common, or continued, as to be considered a settled establishment or institution. [R.] [1913 Webster]

Spain had no other wars save those which were grown into an ordinary. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

4. Anything which is in ordinary or common use. [1913 Webster]

Water buckets, wagons, cart wheels, plow socks, and other ordinaries. --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster]

5. A dining room or eating house where a meal is prepared for all comers, at a fixed price for the meal, in distinction from one where each dish is separately charged; a table d'h[^o]te; hence, also, the meal furnished at such a dining room. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

All the odd words they have picked up in a coffeehouse, or a gaming ordinary, are produced as flowers of style. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

He exacted a tribute for licenses to hawkers and peddlers and to ordinaries. --Bancroft. [1913 Webster]

6. (Her.) A charge or bearing of simple form, one of nine or ten which are in constant use. The {bend}, {chevron}, {chief}, {cross}, {fesse}, {pale}, and {saltire} are uniformly admitted as ordinaries. Some authorities include bar, bend sinister, pile, and others. See {Subordinary}. [1913 Webster]

{In ordinary}. (a) In actual and constant service; statedly attending and serving; as, a physician or chaplain in ordinary. An ambassador in ordinary is one constantly resident at a foreign court. (b) (Naut.) Out of commission and laid up; -- said of a naval vessel.

{Ordinary of the Mass} (R. C. Ch.), the part of the Mass which is the same every day; -- called also the {canon of the Mass}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Canon of the Mass — (Latin: Canon Missæ , Canon Actionis ) is the name given in the Roman Missal, from the first typical edition of Pope Pius V in 1570 to that of Pope John XXIII in 1962, to the part of the Mass of the Roman Rite that begins after the Sanctus with… …   Wikipedia

  • Canon of the Mass — canon can on (k[a^]n [u^]n), n. [OE. canon, canoun, AS. canon rule (cf. F. canon, LL. canon, and, for sense 7, F. chanoine, LL. canonicus), fr. L. canon a measuring line, rule, model, fr. Gr. kanw n rule, rod, fr. ka nh, ka nnh, reed. See {Cane} …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Canon of the Mass — Mass Mass (m[.a]s), n. [OE. masse, messe, AS. m[ae]sse. LL. missa, from L. mittere, missum, to send, dismiss: cf. F. messe. In the ancient churches, the public services at which the catechumens were permitted to be present were called missa… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Ordinary of the Mass — The Ordinary of the Mass (Latin: Ordo Missae) is the set of texts of the Roman Catholic Church Latin Rite Mass that are generally invariable. This contrasts with the proper, which are items of the Mass that change with the feast or following the… …   Wikipedia

  • Ordinary of the Mass — Ordinary Or di*na*ry, n.; pl. {Ordinaries} ( r[i^]z). 1. (Law) (a) (Roman Law) An officer who has original jurisdiction in his own right, and not by deputation. (b) (Eng. Law) One who has immediate jurisdiction in matters ecclesiastical; an… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mass of the Catechumens — The Mass (or Liturgy) of the Catechumens is an ancient title for the first half of the Roman Catholic or Eastern Orthodox worship service known as the Mass or Divine Liturgy. This part of the Mass is now referred to by the Catholic Church as the… …   Wikipedia

  • The Day of the Locust — For the film based on the book, see The Day of the Locust (film). The Day of the Locust   …   Wikipedia

  • Liturgical books of the Roman Rite — The liturgical books of the Roman Rite at the beginning of the twentieth century, writings designed to specify the way the religious services of that liturgical rite of the Roman Catholic Church were then held, are described in this article. For… …   Wikipedia

  • History of the Roman Canon — From the seventh century the Canon of the Mass has remained relatively unchanged. It is to Pope Gregory I (590 604) the great organiser of all the Roman Liturgy, that tradition ascribes its final revision and arrangement. His reign then makes the …   Wikipedia

  • Text and rubrics of the Roman Canon — Before the 1970 revision of the Roman Missal, the Mass had, in the Roman Rite, only one Anaphora or Eucharistic Prayer, which was referred to as the Canon of the Mass. Since the 1970 revision, which made only minimal changes in the text, but… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”