Calculate Cal"cu*late, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Calculater}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Calculating}.] [L, calculatus, p. p. of calculate, fr. calculus a pebble, a stone used in reckoning; hence, a reckoning, fr. calx, calcis, a stone used in gaming, limestone. See {Calx}.] 1. To ascertain or determine by mathematical processes, usually by the ordinary rules of arithmetic; to reckon up; to estimate; to compute. [1913 Webster]

A calencar exacity calculated than any othe. --North. [1913 Webster]

2. To ascertain or predict by mathematical or astrological computations the time, circumstances, or other conditions of; to forecast or compute the character or consequences of; as, to calculate or cast one's nativity. [1913 Webster]

A cunning man did calculate my birth. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. To adjust for purpose; to adapt by forethought or calculation; to fit or prepare by the adaptation of means to an end; as, to calculate a system of laws for the government and protection of a free people. [1913 Webster]

[Religion] is . . . calculated for our benefit. --Abp. Tillotson. [1913 Webster]

4. To plan; to expect; to think. [Local, U. S.]

Syn: To compute; reckon; count; estimate; rate.

Usage: {To Calculate}, {Compute}. {Reckon}, {Count}. These words indicate the means by which we arrive at a given result in regard to quantity. We calculate with a view to obtain a certain point of knowledge; as, to calculate an eclipse. We compute by combining given numbers, in order to learn the grand result. We reckon and count in carrying out the details of a computation. These words are also used in a secondary and figurative sense. ``Calculate is rather a conjection from what is, as to what may be; computation is a rational estimate of what has been, from what is; reckoning is a conclusive conviction, a pleasing assurance that a thing will happen; counting indicates an expectation. We calculate on a gain; we compute any loss sustained, or the amount of any mischief done; we reckon on a promised pleasure; we count the hours and minutes until the time of enjoyment arrives'' --Crabb. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

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