Byzantine style
Byzantine By*zan"tine (b[i^]*z[a^]n"t[i^]n), a. Of or pertaining to Byzantium. -- n. A native or inhabitant of Byzantium, now Constantinople; sometimes, applied to an inhabitant of the modern city of Constantinople. [Written also {Bizantine}.] [1913 Webster]

{Byzantine church}, the Eastern or Greek church, as distinguished from the Western or Roman or Latin church. See under {Greek}.

{Byzantine empire}, the Eastern Roman or Greek empire from a. d. 364 or a. d. 395 to the capture of Constantinople by the Turks, a. d. 1453.

{Byzantine historians}, historians and writers (Zonaras, Procopius, etc.) who lived in the Byzantine empire. --P. Cyc.

{Byzantine style} (Arch.), a style of architecture developed in the Byzantine empire.

Note: Its leading forms are the round arch, the dome, the pillar, the circle, and the cross. The capitals of the pillars are of endless variety, and full of invention. The mosque of St. Sophia, Constantinople, and the church of St. Mark, Venice, are prominent examples of Byzantine architecture. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Byzantine — By*zan tine (b[i^]*z[a^]n t[i^]n), a. Of or pertaining to Byzantium. n. A native or inhabitant of Byzantium, now Constantinople; sometimes, applied to an inhabitant of the modern city of Constantinople. [Written also {Bizantine}.] [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Byzantine church — Byzantine By*zan tine (b[i^]*z[a^]n t[i^]n), a. Of or pertaining to Byzantium. n. A native or inhabitant of Byzantium, now Constantinople; sometimes, applied to an inhabitant of the modern city of Constantinople. [Written also {Bizantine}.] [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Byzantine empire — Byzantine By*zan tine (b[i^]*z[a^]n t[i^]n), a. Of or pertaining to Byzantium. n. A native or inhabitant of Byzantium, now Constantinople; sometimes, applied to an inhabitant of the modern city of Constantinople. [Written also {Bizantine}.] [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Byzantine historians — Byzantine By*zan tine (b[i^]*z[a^]n t[i^]n), a. Of or pertaining to Byzantium. n. A native or inhabitant of Byzantium, now Constantinople; sometimes, applied to an inhabitant of the modern city of Constantinople. [Written also {Bizantine}.] [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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