Buoyancies
Buoyancy Buoy"an*cy, n.; pl. {Buoyancies}. 1. The property of floating on the surface of a liquid, or in a fluid, as in the atmosphere; specific lightness, which is inversely as the weight compared with that of an equal volume of water. [1913 Webster]

2. (Physics) The upward pressure exerted upon a floating body by a fluid, which is equal to the weight of the body; hence, also, the weight of a floating body, as measured by the volume of fluid displaced. [1913 Webster]

Such are buoyancies or displacements of the different classes of her majesty's ships. --Eng. Cyc. [1913 Webster]

3. Cheerfulness; vivacity; liveliness; sprightliness; -- the opposite of {heaviness}; as, buoyancy of spirits. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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