Adducing
Adduce Ad*duce", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Adduced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Adducing}.] [L. adducere, adductum, to lead or bring to; ad + ducere to lead. See {Duke}, and cf. {Adduct}.] To bring forward or offer, as an argument, passage, or consideration which bears on a statement or case; to cite; to allege. [1913 Webster]

Reasons . . . were adduced on both sides. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

Enough could not be adduced to satisfy the purpose of illustration. --De Quincey. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To present; allege; advance; cite; quote; assign; urge; name; mention. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • adducing — n. offering as an example, bringing forward as evidence ad·duce || É™ djuːs v. offer as an example, bring forward in argument, offer as proof, cite as evidence …   English contemporary dictionary

  • adducing — noun citing as evidence or proof • Hypernyms: ↑argument, ↑statement …   Useful english dictionary

  • the burden of adducing evidence — legal duty of displaying evidence that is imposed upon one of the parties in a trial …   English contemporary dictionary

  • EVIDENCE — Non Evidentiary Proceedings in Biblical Law The revelation of divine law is found not only in legislation but also in adjudication in particular cases (cf. Lev. 24:12–13; Num. 15:32–34; 27:1–8; Deut. 1:17), whether through Moses or judges or… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Adduce — Ad*duce , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Adduced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Adducing}.] [L. adducere, adductum, to lead or bring to; ad + ducere to lead. See {Duke}, and cf. {Adduct}.] To bring forward or offer, as an argument, passage, or consideration which… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Adduced — Adduce Ad*duce , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Adduced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Adducing}.] [L. adducere, adductum, to lead or bring to; ad + ducere to lead. See {Duke}, and cf. {Adduct}.] To bring forward or offer, as an argument, passage, or consideration… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Adduction — Ad*duc tion, n. [Cf. F. adduction. See {Adduce}.] 1. The act of adducing or bringing forward. [1913 Webster] An adduction of facts gathered from various quarters. I. Taylor. [1913 Webster] 2. (Physiol.) The action by which the parts of the body… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Adductive — Ad*duc tive, a. Adducing, or bringing towards or to something. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Assert — As*sert , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Asserted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Asserting}.] [L. assertus, p. p. of asserere to join or fasten to one s self, claim, maintain; ad + serere to join or bind together. See {Series}.] 1. To affirm; to declare with assurance …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Asserted — Assert As*sert , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Asserted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Asserting}.] [L. assertus, p. p. of asserere to join or fasten to one s self, claim, maintain; ad + serere to join or bind together. See {Series}.] 1. To affirm; to declare with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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