Broach
Broach Broach, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Broached}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Broaching}.] [F. brocher, fr. broche. See {Broach}, n.] 1. To spit; to pierce as with a spit. [1913 Webster]

I'll broach the tadpole on my rapier's point. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To tap; to pierce, as a cask, in order to draw the liquor. Hence: To let out; to shed, as blood. [1913 Webster]

Whereat with blade, with bloody blameful blade, He bravely broached his boiling bloody breast. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. To open for the first time, as stores. [1913 Webster]

You shall want neither weapons, victuals, nor aid; I will open the old armories, I will broach my store, and will bring forth my stores. --Knolles. [1913 Webster]

4. To make public; to utter; to publish first; to put forth; to introduce as a topic of conversation. [1913 Webster]

Those very opinions themselves had broached. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

5. To cause to begin or break out. [Obs.] --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. (Masonry) To shape roughly, as a block of stone, by chiseling with a coarse tool. [Scot. & North of Eng.] [1913 Webster]

7. To enlarge or dress (a hole), by using a broach. [1913 Webster]

{To broach to} (Naut.), to incline suddenly to windward, so as to lay the sails aback, and expose the vessel to the danger of oversetting. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:
, , , (for the first time) / (a subject), , , , / , , ,


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Broach — may mean: *Broach (metalworking) A metalworking tool with a series of chisel points mounted on one piece of steel. *Broach (sailing) A sudden instability in the heading of a sailboat when sailing downwind. *Broach (submarine) Submarines operating …   Wikipedia

  • broach — [brōch] n. [ME broche, a pin, peg, spit < OFr broche, broc < ML brocca, a spike, point < L broccus, with projecting teeth; of Celt orig.] 1. a sharp pointed rod used to hold roasting meat; spit 2. a tapered bit on a metal cutting machine …   English World dictionary

  • Broach — Broach, n. [OE. broche, F. broche, fr. LL. brocca; prob. of Celtic origin; cf. W. proc thrust, stab, Gael. brog awl. Cf. {Brooch}.] 1. A spit. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] He turned a broach that had worn a crown. Bacon. [1913 Webster] 2. An awl; a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • broach — [brəutʃ US broutʃ] v [T] [Date: 1400 1500; Origin: broach to make a hole in, stab (14 17 centuries), from broach tool for making holes (14 17 centuries), from French broche; BROOCH] 1.) broach the subject/question/matter etc to mention a subject… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • broach — [ broutʃ ] verb transitive to begin discussing something with someone, especially when you feel nervous because it may upset them: He decided it was time to broach the subject of a pay raise …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • broach — broach·er; broach; …   English syllables

  • broach — [v1] bring up a topic advance, approach, bring up, hint at, interject, interpose, introduce, mention, moot, move, offer, open up, propose, raise subject, speak of, submit, suggest, talk of, touch on, ventilate*; concept 51 Ant. not mention broach …   New thesaurus

  • Broach — (spr. Brotsch), 1) Stadt in dem gleichnamigen Steuerbezirke (Collectorata) der britischen Präsidentschaft Bombay in Ostindien, an der rechten Seite der Nerbudda (Nasmada), etwa 7 Ml. oberhalb deren Mündung; mit 31,330 Ew., von denen 12,971 in der …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Broach — (spr. brōtsch), Stadt, s. Barotsch …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Broach — (spr. brohtsch), engl. verderbt für Bharotsch (s.d.) …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

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