Bracchia
Brachium Brach"i*um, n.; pl. {Bracchia}. [L. brachium or bracchium, arm.] (Anat.) The upper arm; the segment of the fore limb between the shoulder and the elbow. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bracchĭa — (a. Geogr.), Insel an der dalmatischen Küste; j. Brazza …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Nunquam direxerit bracchia contra torrentem. — См. Идти против течения …   Большой толково-фразеологический словарь Михельсона (оригинальная орфография)

  • fier-à-bras — [ fjɛrabra ] n. m. • XIVe; du n. pr. d un géant sarrasin des chansons de geste, p. ê. de fera bracchia « bras redoutables », d apr. fier ♦ Vieilli Fanfaron. ⇒ matamore. Des fiers à bras. « On se tient à égale distance de la fanfaronnade et de la… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Angle brace — Brace Brace, n. [OF. brace, brasse, the two arms, embrace, fathom, F. brasse fathom, fr. L. bracchia the arms (stretched out), pl. of bracchium arm; cf. Gr. ?.] 1. That which holds anything tightly or supports it firmly; a bandage or a prop.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Brace — Brace, n. [OF. brace, brasse, the two arms, embrace, fathom, F. brasse fathom, fr. L. bracchia the arms (stretched out), pl. of bracchium arm; cf. Gr. ?.] 1. That which holds anything tightly or supports it firmly; a bandage or a prop. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Brachium — Brach i*um, n.; pl. {Bracchia}. [L. brachium or bracchium, arm.] (Anat.) The upper arm; the segment of the fore limb between the shoulder and the elbow. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • brace — I. verb (braced; bracing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French bracer to embrace, from brace Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. archaic to fasten tightly ; bind 2. a …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Dactylic hexameter — (also known as heroic hexameter ) is a form of meter in poetry or a rhythmic scheme. It is traditionally associated with the quantitative meter of classical epic poetry in both Greek and Latin, and was consequently considered to be the Grand… …   Wikipedia

  • Vulgar Latin — (in Latin, sermo vulgaris , folk speech ) is a blanket term covering the popular dialects and sociolects of the Latin language which diverged from each other in the early Middle Ages, evolving into the Romance languages by the 9th century. The… …   Wikipedia

  • Embracery — is the attempt to influence a juror corruptly to give his verdict in favour of one side or the other in a trial, by promise, persuasions, entreaties, money, entertainments and the like.In English law, it was an offence both at common law and by… …   Wikipedia

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