Write Write, v. t. [imp. {Wrote}; p. p. {Written}; Archaic imp. & p. p. {Writ}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Writing}.] [OE. writen, AS. wr[=i]tan; originally, to scratch, to score; akin to OS. wr[=i]tan to write, to tear, to wound, D. rijten to tear, to rend, G. reissen, OHG. r[=i]zan, Icel. r[=i]ta to write, Goth. writs a stroke, dash, letter. Cf. {Race} tribe, lineage.] [1913 Webster] 1. To set down, as legible characters; to form the conveyance of meaning; to inscribe on any material by a suitable instrument; as, to write the characters called letters; to write figures. [1913 Webster]

2. To set down for reading; to express in legible or intelligible characters; to inscribe; as, to write a deed; to write a bill of divorcement; hence, specifically, to set down in an epistle; to communicate by letter. [1913 Webster]

Last night she enjoined me to write some lines to one she loves. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

I chose to write the thing I durst not speak To her I loved. --Prior. [1913 Webster]

3. Hence, to compose or produce, as an author. [1913 Webster]

I purpose to write the history of England from the accession of King James the Second down to a time within the memory of men still living. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

4. To impress durably; to imprint; to engrave; as, truth written on the heart. [1913 Webster]

5. To make known by writing; to record; to prove by one's own written testimony; -- often used reflexively. [1913 Webster]

He who writes himself by his own inscription is like an ill painter, who, by writing on a shapeless picture which he hath drawn, is fain to tell passengers what shape it is, which else no man could imagine. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

{To write to}, to communicate by a written document to.

{Written laws}, laws deriving their force from express legislative enactment, as contradistinguished from unwritten, or common, law. See the Note under {Law}, and {Common law}, under {Common}, a. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • writ — / rit/ n [Old English, something written] 1: a letter that was issued in the name of the English monarch from Anglo Saxon times to declare his grants, wishes, and commands 2: an order or mandatory process in writing issued in the name of the… …   Law dictionary

  • Writ — Writ, n. [AS. writ, gewrit. See {Write}.] [1913 Webster] 1. That which is written; writing; scripture; applied especially to the Scriptures, or the books of the Old and New testaments; as, sacred writ. Though in Holy Writ not named. Milton. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • writ — [rɪt] noun [countable, uncountable] LAW a document from a court that orders someone to do or not to do something: • A number of depositors issued a writ against the central bank, alleging that it had failed to exercise proper supervision. • an… …   Financial and business terms

  • writ — Form of written notice or command issued by a Court or other official. Can include writ of summons, writ of subpoena, writ of attachment, writ of habeas corpus, etc. (Dictionary of Canadian Bankruptcy Terms) United Glossary of Bankruptcy Terms… …   Glossary of Bankruptcy

  • writ — Ⅰ. writ [1] ► NOUN 1) a form of written command in the name of a court or other legal authority, directing a person to act or refrain from acting in a specified way. 2) (one s writ) one s power to enforce compliance or submission. ORIGIN Old… …   English terms dictionary

  • writ — writ1 [rit] vt., vi. archaic pt. & pp. of WRITE: now mainly in the phrase writ large, expressed, shown, or done on a larger scale or in a clearer or more emphatic way writ2 [rit] n. [ME < OE < writan: see WRITE] 1. Now Rare something… …   English World dictionary

  • Writ — Writ, obs. 3d pers. sing. pres. of {Write}, for writeth. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Writ — Writ, archaic imp. & p. p. of {Write}. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Writ —   [rɪt, englisch] das, (s)/ s, ursprünglich ein schriftlicher Befehl des englischen Königs an einen Lehnsmann, heute im angelsächsischen Recht die mit dem Siegel eines Gerichts oder der Krone versehene, an eine Gerichts oder eine Privatperson… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Writ — [ rit] der; [s], s <aus engl. writ »behördlicher Erlass«, verwandt mit altnord. rit u. got. writs> im alten engl. Recht jeder schriftliche Befehl des Königs an einen Lehnträger, dessen Nichtbeachtung als Felonie, d. h. als Treuebruch,… …   Das große Fremdwörterbuch

  • writ — (n.) O.E. writ something written, piece of writing, from the past participle stem of writan (see WRITE (Cf. write)). Used of legal documents or instruments since at least 1121 …   Etymology dictionary

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