Wreathe Wreathe, v. t. [imp. {Wreathed}; p. p. {Wreathed}; Archaic {Wreathen}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Wreathing}.] [See {Wreath}, n.] [Written also {wreath}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cause to revolve or writhe; to twist about; to turn. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

And from so heavy sight his head did wreathe. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

2. To twist; to convolve; to wind one about another; to entwine. [1913 Webster]

The nods and smiles of recognition into which this singular physiognomy was wreathed. --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster]

From his slack hand the garland wreathed for Eve Down dropped. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

3. To surround with anything twisted or convolved; to encircle; to infold. [1913 Webster]

Each wreathed in the other's arms. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Dusk faces with withe silken turbants wreathed. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

And with thy winding ivy wreathes her lance. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

4. To twine or twist about; to surround; to encircle. [1913 Webster]

In the flowers that wreathe the sparkling bowl, Fell adders hiss. --Prior. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Wreathe — Wreathe, v. i. To be intewoven or entwined; to twine together; as, a bower of wreathing trees. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wreathe — index intertwine Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • wreathe — [ri:ð] v literary [Date: 1500 1600; Origin: Partly from wreath; partly from wrethen, old past participle of writhe] 1.) be wreathed in sth to be covered in something ▪ The mountains were wreathed in mist. 2.) be wreathed in smiles to be smiling… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • wreathe — [ rið ] verb MAINLY LITERARY 1. ) transitive usually passive if something is wreathed in something such as smoke, steam, or shadow, it is surrounded by it: The city below them was wreathed in mist. a ) intransitive if smoke, steam or MIST… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • wreathe — (v.) 1520s, a back formation from wrethen, Middle English pp. of WRITHE (Cf. writhe). Related: Wreathed; wreathing …   Etymology dictionary

  • wreathe — *wind, coil, curl, twist, twine, entwine …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • wreathe — ► VERB 1) (usu. be wreathed) envelop, surround, or encircle. 2) (of smoke) move with a curling motion. ORIGIN from WRITHE(Cf. ↑writhe), reinforced by WREATH(Cf. ↑wreath) …   English terms dictionary

  • wreathe — [rēth] vt. wreathed, wreathing [Early ModE, back form. < ME wrethen, pp. of writhen,WRITHE; in later use < WREATH] 1. to coil, twist, or entwine, esp. so as to form into a wreath 2. to coil, twist, or entwine around; encircle [clouds… …   English World dictionary

  • wreathe — en·wreathe; in·ter·wreathe; un·wreathe; wreathe; …   English syllables

  • wreathe — UK [riːð] / US [rɪð] verb Word forms wreathe : present tense I/you/we/they wreathe he/she/it wreathes present participle wreathing past tense wreathed past participle wreathed mainly literary 1) a) [transitive, usually passive] if something is… …   English dictionary

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