Woe worth
Woe Woe, n. [OE. wo, wa, woo, AS. w[=a], interj.; akin to D. wee, OS. & OHG. w[=e], G. weh, Icel. vei, Dan. vee, Sw. ve, Goth. wai; cf. L. vae, Gr. ?. [root]128. Cf. {Wail}.] [Formerly written also {wo}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Grief; sorrow; misery; heavy calamity. [1913 Webster]

Thus saying, from her side the fatal key, Sad instrument of all our woe, she took. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

[They] weep each other's woe. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

2. A curse; a malediction. [1913 Webster]

Can there be a woe or curse in all the stores of vengeance equal to the malignity of such a practice? --South. [1913 Webster]

Note: Woe is used in denunciation, and in exclamations of sorrow. `` Woe is me! for I am undone.'' --Isa. vi. 5. [1913 Webster]

O! woe were us alive [i.e., in life]. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Woe unto him that striveth with his Maker! --Isa. xlv. 9. [1913 Webster]

{Woe worth}, Woe be to. See {Worth}, v. i. [1913 Webster]

Woe worth the chase, woe worth the day, That costs thy life, my gallant gray! --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • woe worth the day — Cursed be the day (see ↑worth2) • • • Main Entry: ↑woe …   Useful english dictionary

  • woe worth thee! woe betide thee! —  execrations. N …   A glossary of provincial and local words used in England

  • Woe — Woe, n. [OE. wo, wa, woo, AS. w[=a], interj.; akin to D. wee, OS. & OHG. w[=e], G. weh, Icel. vei, Dan. vee, Sw. ve, Goth. wai; cf. L. vae, Gr. ?. [root]128. Cf. {Wail}.] [Formerly written also {wo}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Grief; sorrow; misery;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Worth — Worth, v. i. [OE. worthen, wur[thorn]en, to become, AS. weor[eth]an; akin to OS. wer[eth]an, D. worden, G. werden, OHG. werdan, Icel. ver[eth]a, Sw. varda, Goth. wa[ i]rpan, L. vertere to turn, Skr. v[.r]t, v. i., to turn, to roll, to become.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • worth — worth1 [wʉrth] n. [ME < OE weorth, akin to weorthian, to honor, Ger wert, worth, werden, to become < IE * wert , to turn: see VERSE] 1. material value, esp. as expressed in terms of money or some other medium of exchange 2. that quality of… …   English World dictionary

  • worth — worth1 /werrth/, prep. 1. good or important enough to justify (what is specified): advice worth taking; a place worth visiting. 2. having a value of, or equal in value to, as in money: This vase is worth 12 dollars. 3. having property to the… …   Universalium

  • worth — I [[t]wɜrθ[/t]] prep. 1) good or important enough to justify (what is specified): advice worth taking; a place worth visiting[/ex] 2) having a value of, or equal in value to, as in money: This vase is worth 20 dollars[/ex] 3) having property to… …   From formal English to slang

  • worth — I. /wɜθ / (say werth) adjective 1. good or important enough to justify (what is specified): advice worth taking; a place worth visiting. 2. having a value of, or equal in value to, as in money. 3. having property to the value or amount of. –noun… …   Australian English dictionary

  • worth — I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English weorthan; akin to Old High German werdan to become, Latin vertere to turn, Lithuanian versti to overturn, Sanskrit vartate he turns Date: before 12th century archaic become usually… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • worth — {{11}}worth (1) O.E. weorð equal in value to, from P.Gmc. *werthaz “toward, opposite,” hence “equivalent, worth (Cf. O.Fris. werth, O.N. verðr, Du. waard, O.H.G. werd, Ger. wert, Goth. wairþs worth, worthy ), perhaps a derivative of PIE… …   Etymology dictionary

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