Witness
Witness Wit"ness, n. [AS. witness, gewitnes, from witan to know. [root]133. See {Wit}, v. i.] [1913 Webster] 1. Attestation of a fact or an event; testimony. [1913 Webster]

May we with . . . the witness of a good conscience, pursue him with any further revenge? --Shak. [1913 Webster]

If I bear witness of myself, my witness is not true. --John v. 31. [1913 Webster]

2. That which furnishes evidence or proof. [1913 Webster]

Laban said to Jacob, . . . This heap be witness, and this pillar be witness. --Gen. xxxi. 51, 52. [1913 Webster]

3. One who is cognizant; a person who beholds, or otherwise has personal knowledge of, anything; as, an eyewitness; an earwitness. ``Thyself art witness I am betrothed.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Upon my looking round, I was witness to appearances which filled me with melancholy and regret. --R. Hall. [1913 Webster]

4. (Law) (a) One who testifies in a cause, or gives evidence before a judicial tribunal; as, the witness in court agreed in all essential facts. (b) One who sees the execution of an instrument, and subscribes it for the purpose of confirming its authenticity by his testimony; one who witnesses a will, a deed, a marriage, or the like. [1913 Webster]

{Privileged witnesses}. (Law) See under {Privileged}.

{With a witness}, effectually; to a great degree; with great force, so as to leave some mark as a testimony. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]

This, I confess, is haste with a witness. --South. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

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  • witness — wit·ness 1 n [Old English witnes knowledge, testimony, witness, from wit mind, sense, knowledge] 1 a: attestation of a fact or event in witness whereof the parties have executed this release b: evidence (as of the authenticity of a conveyance by… …   Law dictionary

  • WITNESS — (Heb. עֵד, one that has personal knowledge of an event or a fact. The evidence of at least two witnesses was required for convicting the accused (Num. 35:30; Deut. 17:6; 19:15; cf. I Kings 21:10, 13). Commercial transactions of importance took… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Witness — • One who is present, bears testimony, furnishes evidence or proof Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Witness     Witness     † …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • witness — [n] person who observes an event attestant, attestor, beholder, bystander, corroborator, deponent, eyewitness, gawker, looker on, observer, onlooker, proof, rubbernecker*, signatory, signer, spectator, testifier, testimony, viewer, watcher;… …   New thesaurus

  • Witness — Wit ness, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Witnessed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Witnessing}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To see or know by personal presence; to have direct cognizance of. [1913 Webster] This is but a faint sketch of the incalculable calamities and horrors we …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • witness — [wit′nis] n. [ME witnesse < OE (ge)witnes, witness, knowledge, testimony < witan, to know: see WISE1 & NESS] 1. an attesting of a fact, statement, etc.; evidence; testimony 2. a person who saw, or can give a firsthand account of, something… …   English World dictionary

  • Witness — Wit ness, v. i. To bear testimony; to give evidence; to testify. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] The men of Belial witnessed against him. 1 Kings xxi. 13. [1913 Webster] The witnessing of the truth was then so generally attended with this event… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Witness — Título Único testigo (España) Testigo en peligro (Hispanoamérica) Ficha técnica Dirección Peter Weir Producción Edward S. Feldman …   Wikipedia Español

  • witness — ► NOUN 1) a person who sees an event take place. 2) a person giving sworn testimony to a court of law or the police. 3) a person who is present at the signing of a document and signs it themselves to confirm this. 4) (witness to) evidence or… …   English terms dictionary

  • witness — O.E. witnes attestation of fact, event, etc., from personal knowledge; also one who so testifies; originally knowledge, wit, formed from WIT (Cf. wit) (n.) + NESS (Cf. ness). Christian use (late 14c.) is as a literal translation of Gk. martys… …   Etymology dictionary

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