with
Accredit Ac*cred"it, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Accredited}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Accrediting}.] [F. accr['e]diter; [`a] (L. ad) + cr['e]dit credit. See {Credit}.] 1. To put or bring into credit; to invest with credit or authority; to sanction. [1913 Webster]

His censure will . . . accredit his praises. --Cowper. [1913 Webster]

These reasons . . . which accredit and fortify mine opinion. --Shelton. [1913 Webster]

2. To send with letters credential, as an ambassador, envoy, or diplomatic agent; to authorize, as a messenger or delegate. [1913 Webster]

Beton . . . was accredited to the Court of France. --Froude. [1913 Webster]

3. To believe; to credit; to put trust in. [1913 Webster]

The version of early Roman history which was accredited in the fifth century. --Sir G. C. Lewis. [1913 Webster]

He accredited and repeated stories of apparitions and witchcraft. --Southey. [1913 Webster]

4. To credit; to vouch for or consider (some one) as doing something, or (something) as belonging to some one. [1913 Webster]

{To accredit} (one) {with} (something), to attribute something to him; as, Mr. Clay was accredited with these views; they accredit him with a wise saying. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

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  • With — With, prep. [OE. with, AS. wi? with, against; akin to AS. wi?er against, OFries. with, OS. wi?, wi?ar, D. weder, we[^e]r (in comp.), G. wider against, wieder gain, OHG. widar again, against, Icel. vi? against, with, by, at, Sw. vid at, by, Dan.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • With — With, n. See {Withe}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • with — preposition Etymology: Middle English, against, from, with, from Old English; akin to Old English wither against, Old High German widar against, back, Sanskrit vi apart Date: before 12th century 1. a. in opposition to ; against < had a fight with …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • with — Acquaintance Ac*quaint ance, n. [OE. aqueintance, OF. acointance, fr. acointier. See {Acquaint}.] 1. A state of being acquainted, or of having intimate, or more than slight or superficial, knowledge; personal knowledge gained by intercourse short …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • with — Withe Withe (?; 277), n. [OE. withe. ????. See {Withy}, n.] [Written also {with}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A flexible, slender twig or branch used as a band; a willow or osier twig; a withy. [1913 Webster] 2. A band consisting of a twig twisted. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • With You and Without You — was a book written by Ann M. Martin in 1986.Liza O Hara s family is abruptly confronted with the news that Mr. O Hara is dying from heart disease. After the initial shock the family unites to make his last months as enjoyable as possible… …   Wikipedia

  • With the Lights Out — Box set by Nirvana Released November 23, 2004 …   Wikipedia

  • With You — may refer to:* With You (Jessica Simpson song) * With You (The Subways song) * With U , a song by Janet Jackson * With You (Chris Brown song) * With You (Linkin Park song) * With You (Lila McCann song) * With You (Hallmark exclusive), an album by …   Wikipedia

  • with it — See: GET WITH IT …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • with it — See: GET WITH IT …   Dictionary of American idioms

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