Window Win"dow, n. [OE. windowe, windoge, Icel. vindauga window, properly, wind eye; akin to Dan. vindue. ????. See {Wind}, n., and {Eye}.] [1913 Webster] 1. An opening in the wall of a building for the admission of light and air, usually closed by casements or sashes containing some transparent material, as glass, and capable of being opened and shut at pleasure. [1913 Webster]

I leaped from the window of the citadel. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Then to come, in spite of sorrow, And at my window bid good morrow. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. (Arch.) The shutter, casement, sash with its fittings, or other framework, which closes a window opening. [1913 Webster]

3. A figure formed of lines crossing each other. [R.] [1913 Webster]

Till he has windows on his bread and butter. --King. [1913 Webster]

4. a period of time in which some activity may be uniquely possible, more easily accomplished, or more likely to succeed; as, a launch window for a mission to Mars. [PJC]

5. (Computers) a region on a computer display screen which represents a separate computational process, controlled more or less independently from the remaining part of the screen, and having widely varying functions, from simply displaying information to comprising a separate conceptual screen in which output can be visualized, input can be controlled, program dialogs may be accomplished, and a program may be controlled independently of any other processes occurring in the computer. The window may have a fixed location and size, or (as in modern Graphical User Interfaces) may have its size and location on the screen under the control of the operator. [PJC]

{French window} (Arch.), a casement window in two folds, usually reaching to the floor; -- called also {French casement}.

{Window back} (Arch.), the inside face of the low, and usually thin, piece of wall between the window sill and the floor below.

{Window blind}, a blind or shade for a window.

{Window bole}, part of a window closed by a shutter which can be opened at will. [Scot.]

{Window box}, one of the hollows in the sides of a window frame for the weights which counterbalance a lifting sash.

{Window frame}, the frame of a window which receives and holds the sashes or casement.

{Window glass}, panes of glass for windows; the kind of glass used in windows.

{Window martin} (Zo["o]l.), the common European martin. [Prov. Eng.]

{Window oyster} (Zo["o]l.), a marine bivalve shell ({Placuna placenta}) native of the East Indies and China. Its valves are very broad, thin, and translucent, and are said to have been used formerly in place of glass.

{Window pane}. (a) (Arch.) See {Pane}, n., 3 (b) . (b) (Zo["o]l.) See {Windowpane}, in the Vocabulary.

{Window sash}, the sash, or light frame, in which panes of glass are set for windows.

{Window seat}, a seat arranged in the recess of a window. See {Window stool}, under {Stool}.

{Window shade}, a shade or blind for a window; usually, one that is hung on a roller.

{Window shell} (Zo["o]l.), the window oyster.

{Window shutter}, a shutter or blind used to close or darken windows.

{Window sill} (Arch.), the flat piece of wood, stone, or the like, at the bottom of a window frame.

{Window swallow} (Zo["o]l.), the common European martin. [Prov. Eng.]

{Window tax}, a tax or duty formerly levied on all windows, or openings for light, above the number of eight in houses standing in cities or towns. [Eng.] [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • window — window, casement, dormer, oriel can mean an opening in the wall of a building that is usually covered with glass and serves to admit light and air. Window is the ordinary general term for the entire structure, including both its framework and the …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • window — (n.) early 13c., lit. wind eye, from O.N. vindauga, from vindr wind (see WIND (Cf. wind) (n.1)) + auga eye. (see EYE (Cf. eye) (n.)). Replaced O.E. eagþyrl, lit. eye hole, and eagduru, lit …   Etymology dictionary

  • window — [win′dō] n. [ME windoge < ON vindauga, window, lit., wind eye < vindr, WIND2 + auga, an eye; akin to Ger auge, EYE] 1. a) an opening in a building, vehicle, or container, for letting in light or air or for looking through, usually having a… …   English World dictionary

  • Window — (von engl. window „Fenster“) oder Plural Windows ([ˈwɪndoʊz]) stehen für: Microsoft Windows, ein Betriebssystem der Firma Microsoft Fenster (Computer), ein Benutzerschnittstellenkonzept bei Computern X Window System, eine grafische… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • window — WÍNDOW s.n. Fereastră, geam; vitrină. [pr. uíndău] (din engl. window) Trimis de tavi, 14.05.2008. Sursa: MDN  WINDOW [UÍNDOU] s. n. fereastră, geam; vitrină. (< engl. window) Trimis de raduborza, 14.02.2008. Sursa: MDN …   Dicționar Român

  • window — ► NOUN 1) an opening in a wall or roof, fitted with glass in a frame to let in light or air and allow people to see out. 2) an opening through which customers are served in a bank, ticket office, etc. 3) a transparent panel in an envelope to show …   English terms dictionary

  • Window — Win dow, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Windowed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Windowing}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To furnish with windows. [1913 Webster] 2. To place at or in a window. [R.] [1913 Webster] Wouldst thou be windowed in great Rome and see Thy master thus… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Window — This article is about the part of a building. For the Microsoft operating system, see Microsoft Windows. For other uses, see Window (disambiguation) and Windows (disambiguation). Pair of windows, Old Ship Church, Hingham, Massachusetts …   Wikipedia

  • window — windowless, adj. windowy, adj. /win doh/, n. 1. an opening in the wall of a building, the side of a vehicle, etc., for the admission of air or light, or both, commonly fitted with a frame in which are set movable sashes containing panes of glass …   Universalium

  • window — noun 1 in a building, car, etc. ADJECTIVE ▪ big, huge, large, long, tall, wide ▪ narrow, small, tiny …   Collocations dictionary

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