Winding
Wind Wind, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Wound} (wound) (rarely {Winded}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Winding}.] [OE. winden, AS. windan; akin to OS. windan, D. & G. winden, OHG. wintan, Icel. & Sw. vinda, Dan. vinde, Goth. windan (in comp.). Cf. {Wander}, {Wend}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To turn completely, or with repeated turns; especially, to turn about something fixed; to cause to form convolutions about anything; to coil; to twine; to twist; to wreathe; as, to wind thread on a spool or into a ball. [1913 Webster]

Whether to wind The woodbine round this arbor. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. To entwist; to infold; to encircle. [1913 Webster]

Sleep, and I will wind thee in arms. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. To have complete control over; to turn and bend at one's pleasure; to vary or alter or will; to regulate; to govern. ``To turn and wind a fiery Pegasus.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

In his terms so he would him wind. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Gifts blind the wise, and bribes do please And wind all other witnesses. --Herrick. [1913 Webster]

Were our legislature vested in the prince, he might wind and turn our constitution at his pleasure. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

4. To introduce by insinuation; to insinuate. [1913 Webster]

You have contrived . . . to wind Yourself into a power tyrannical. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Little arts and dexterities they have to wind in such things into discourse. --Gov. of Tongue. [1913 Webster]

5. To cover or surround with something coiled about; as, to wind a rope with twine. [1913 Webster]

{To wind off}, to unwind; to uncoil.

{To wind out}, to extricate. [Obs.] --Clarendon.

{To wind up}. (a) To coil into a ball or small compass, as a skein of thread; to coil completely. (b) To bring to a conclusion or settlement; as, to wind up one's affairs; to wind up an argument. (c) To put in a state of renewed or continued motion, as a clock, a watch, etc., by winding the spring, or that which carries the weight; hence, to prepare for continued movement or action; to put in order anew. ``Fate seemed to wind him up for fourscore years.'' --Dryden. ``Thus they wound up his temper to a pitch.'' --Atterbury. (d) To tighten (the strings) of a musical instrument, so as to tune it. ``Wind up the slackened strings of thy lute.'' --Waller. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

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  • winding — winding, sinuous, serpentine, tortuous, flexuous can all mean curving first one way and then another. Winding, the general and the ordinary term, often implies spiral ascent {winding stairs} {a winding mountain road} When applied to things in a… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Winding — Wind ing, n. 1. A turn or turning; a bend; a curve; flexure; meander; as, the windings of a road or stream. [1913 Webster] To nurse the saplings tall, and curl the grove With ringlets quaint, and wanton windings wove. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Winding — bezeichnet: den Familienname folgender Personen: Andréas Winding (1928–1977), französischer Kameramann Kai Winding (1922–1983), US amerikanischer Jazzposaunist dänischer Herkunft den Namen folgender Person: Nicolas Winding Refn (* 1970),… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • winding — [wīn′diŋ] n. 1. the action or effect of a person or thing that winds; specif., a) a sinuous path or course b) [usually pl.] devious methods, actions, etc. c) a coiling, spiraling, or twining d) a single turn 2. something that winds; specif …   English World dictionary

  • Winding — Wind ing, n. [From {Wind} to blow.] (Naut.) A call by the boatswain s whistle. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Winding — Wind ing, a. [From {Wind} to twist.] Twisting from a direct line or an even surface; circuitous. Keble. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • winding — index circuitous, indirect, labyrinthine, sinuous, tortuous (bending) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • winding — [adj] bending, turning ambiguous, anfractuous, circuitous, convoluted, crooked, curving, devious, flexuous, gyrating, indirect, intricate, involved, labyrinthine, mazy, meandering, roundabout, serpentine, sinuous, snaky, spiraling, tortuous,… …   New thesaurus

  • winding — ► NOUN 1) a twisting movement or course. 2) a thing that winds or is wound round something. ► ADJECTIVE ▪ having a twisting or spiral course …   English terms dictionary

  • winding — The wrapping of wire around a core. See excitation winding exciter winding field winding high tension winding hold in winding holding winding inductive winding primary winding …   Dictionary of automotive terms

  • winding — I. noun Date: before 12th century 1. material (as wire) wound or coiled about an object (as an armature); also a single turn of the wound material 2. a. the act of one that winds b. the manner of winding something 3. a curved or sinuous course,… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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