Winced
Wince Wince, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Winced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Wincing}.] [OE. wincen, winchen, OF. quencir, guenchir, guenchier, giencier, guinchier, and (assumed) winchier, winchir, to give way, to turn aside, fr. OHG. wankjan, wenken, to give way, to waver, fr. winchan to turn aside, to nod, akin to E. wink. See {Wink}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To shrink, as from a blow, or from pain; to flinch; to start back. [1913 Webster]

I will not stir, nor wince, nor speak a word. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To kick or flounce when unsteady, or impatient at a rider; as, a horse winces. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • winced — wɪns n. flinch, start; shrinking movement, recoil, cringe v. flinch, recoil (especially from pain or fear); cringe, involuntarily make a face in response to surprise (or embarrassment, etc.) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • wince — [[t]wɪ̱ns[/t]] winces, wincing, winced VERB If you wince, the muscles of your face tighten suddenly because you have felt a pain or because you have just seen, heard, or remembered something unpleasant. Every time he put any weight on his left… …   English dictionary

  • wince — verb ADVERB ▪ a little, slightly, etc. ▪ inwardly ▪ He winced inwardly at her harsh tone. ▪ visibly VERB + WINCE …   Collocations dictionary

  • wince — UK [wɪns] / US verb [intransitive] Word forms wince : present tense I/you/we/they wince he/she/it winces present participle wincing past tense winced past participle winced to react to something with a sudden expression on your face that shows… …   English dictionary

  • Whimper — Whim per, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Whimpered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Whimpering}.] [Cf. Scot. whimmer, G. wimmern.] To cry with a low, whining, broken voice; to whine; to complain; as, a child whimpers. [1913 Webster] Was there ever yet preacher but there …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Whimpered — Whimper Whim per, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Whimpered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Whimpering}.] [Cf. Scot. whimmer, G. wimmern.] To cry with a low, whining, broken voice; to whine; to complain; as, a child whimpers. [1913 Webster] Was there ever yet preacher… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Whimpering — Whimper Whim per, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Whimpered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Whimpering}.] [Cf. Scot. whimmer, G. wimmern.] To cry with a low, whining, broken voice; to whine; to complain; as, a child whimpers. [1913 Webster] Was there ever yet preacher… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wince — Wince, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Winced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Wincing}.] [OE. wincen, winchen, OF. quencir, guenchir, guenchier, giencier, guinchier, and (assumed) winchier, winchir, to give way, to turn aside, fr. OHG. wankjan, wenken, to give way, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wincing — Wince Wince, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Winced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Wincing}.] [OE. wincen, winchen, OF. quencir, guenchir, guenchier, giencier, guinchier, and (assumed) winchier, winchir, to give way, to turn aside, fr. OHG. wankjan, wenken, to give way …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wince — intransitive verb (winced; wincing) Etymology: Middle English wynsen to kick out, start, from Anglo French *wincer, *guincer to shift direction, dodge, by form of guenchir, probably of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German wenken, wankōn to… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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